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AMA PRO RACING DIRT TRACK TIMELINE

This web page is my attempt - with endless assistance from Bob Herrick of Lansing, MI and Bill Milburn of Flower Mound, TX - to document the majority of the significant achievements and rule changes in professional dirt track racing over the years. It has been - and will continue to be - an ongoing work in progress.

This is NOT an official AMA web site. But you will find more AMA history here than almost anywhere else.

Page Content Updated 5/13/2017

Click on a year to jump to that section





  • Jared Mees completes the career "Hit For The Cycle / Dirt Track Slam" by winning the Daytona Beach, FL TT and then the Atlanta ST. Jared is the first rider to win every type of competition on a twin-cylinder motorcycle.
  • ACHIEVEMENTS MAJOR RULE CHANGES

    1924

      Misc Notes:
    • On May 15, 1924, The Motorcycle & Allied Trade Association (M&ATA) is renamed the American Motorcycle Association (AMA).

    • The AMA begins sanctioning motorcycle races on board tracks and mile dirt tracks across the United States. Racing consists of Class A rules - custom-built, factory-special motorcycles, with professional racers paid by the factories to race. National Championships are awarded based on engine displacement, track length, and race length. Several "National Championship" races might be held during a single event.

    1930

    • Jim Davis (Columbus, OH) is recognized as the Class A National Champion

    1931

    • Joe Petrali (Milwaukee, WI) is recognized as the Class A National Champion

    1932

    • Joe Petrali (Milwaukee, WI) is recognized as the Class A National Champion

    1933

    • Joe Petrali (Milwaukee, WI) is recognized as the Class A National Champion
      Misc Notes:
    • Velocette wins its only Class A dirt track National (George Matheson at Hohukus half mile event)
      Introduction of Class C Racing
    • The AMA introduces “Class C” racing, which replaces the former “Class A” racing (specially built engines & chassis). Only motorcycles that are available to the public are allowed to compete. Minor modifications to those motorcycles are permitted. Fuel is limited to pump gas only. Any AMA member may compete.

    • No National Champion is recognized for Class C until 1935. However, like its Class A predecessor, all "National" events are called "National Championships", for track size and distance. (Examples: 5-mile half mile National Champion; 10-mile mile National Champion, etc.).

    • Three professional divisions in each discipline: Novice, Amateur, Expert.

    • All divisions use black numbers on white number plates. Rider numbers are not assigned until late 1942. District letters are not introduced until 1947.

    • Three Class C disciplines: Dirt track, TT, and Road Race.
      • The "TT" is a new type of competition created within the Class C rules. From the 1933 Rules For Competition: "The term Tourist Trophy (or "TT") is derived from the famous Tourist Trophy races held each year in the Isle of Man. It represents, on a small scale, a road race, and consequently should embrace, to the closest possible extent, all the conditions that would be met in driving on the open road. The course should be irregular insofar as possible, so that both right and left hand turns have to be negotiated. It is advisable to include, if possible, a hill that will necessitate gear changing so that the entire motorcycle is made to perform its regular road functions."

      Short track, half mile, mile, and road race rules:
    • All divisions - Novice, Amateur, & Expert - use 500cc overhead valve or 750cc pocket-valve engines. Overhead valve engines will be subjected to this displacement disadvantage until 1969 (see FAQ).
    • Brakes are not permitted on short track, half mile, or mile courses (for safety).
      TT Rules:
    • Junior TT: 350cc (21.35ci) overhead-valve or 500cc (30.50ci) pocket-valve engines
    • Senior TT: 500cc (30.50ci) overhead valve or 750cc (45.70ci) pocket-valve (intake-over-exhaust) engines.
    • Unlimited TT: 0-1310cc (0-80ci) engines.
    • Brakes are permitted.

    1934

    • Louis Balinski (Kalamazoo, MI) is recognized as the Class A National Champion

      Misc Notes:
    • JAP wins its first Class A dirt track National (Andrew Hader at Syracuse, NY mile event)

    • Harley-Davidson wins its first Class C National (Bremen Sykes at Daytona RR event).

    1935

    • Joe Petrali (Milwaukee, WI) is recognized as the Class A National Champion

    • Woodsie Castonguay (Reading, PA) claims the first “Class C National Championship” at Langhorne, PA.
      Misc Notes:
    • The AMA establishes the 100-mile race on the mile oval in Langhorne, PA as the Class C National Championship Race. While all National events continue to be individual "National Championships" (for track size and distance), the winner of this 100-lap race will be considered the "National Champion".

    1936

    • Joe Petrali (Milwaukee, WI) is recognized as the Class A National Champion
      Misc Notes:
    • It is unclear whether or not a rider is recognized as the Class C National Champion in 1936. Lester Hillbish (Indian) wins the 100-mile race at Langhorne - the race which crowned the Class C National Champion in 1935 - but no race reports specify that the race was "the" National Championship.

    1937

    • R.H. Beatty (Wilkensburg, PA) is recognized as the Class A National Champion

    • Lester Hillbish (Reading, PA) claims the "Class C National Championship".
      Misc Notes
    • The AMA moves the “Class C National Championship” event from the mile oval in Langhorne, PA to the mile oval at the Illinois State fairgrounds in Springfield, Illinois. From 1937-1953, the Class C National Champion is awarded to the rider who wins this 25-lap race each year.

    1938

    • Fred Toscani (Garfield, NJ) claims the final Class A National Championship.

    • Woodsie Castonguay (Reading, PA) earns his second AMA Class C National Championship at the Springfield mile.
      Misc Notes:
    • The AMA permits the winner of the previous year’s Class C National Championship to wear the #1 plate for the first time.

    1939

    • Stanley Witinski (Reading, PA) wins the Class C National Championship at the Springfield mile.
      Misc Notes:
    • Some AMA publications into the 21st Century also mention Lester Hillbish (J.L. Hillbish of Reading, PA) as the 1939 "National Champion" alongside Stanley Witinski. Hillbish's only AMA National win in 1939 was the 50-mile dirt track National at Syracuse, NY. Syracuse traditionally held a significant Class A National event near the end of the season, and 1939 was the first time that it held a Class C National event. So perhaps some traditionalists felt that Hillbish deserved to be recognized as a Champion alongside Witinski, since Hillbish had won Syracuse? As of this writing, I have not determined how the Class A National Championship was determined.

    • Norton wins its first dirt track National (Robert Sparks at Langhorne, PA mile event).
      New displacement rule change:
    • All divisions limited to 500cc overhead valve engines or 750cc side-valve engines (replacing 750cc pocket-valve engines). Overhead valve engines will be subjected to this 250cc displacement disadvantage until 1969.

    • New TT Rule Change:
    • Junior TT: 350cc (21.35ci) overhead-valve or 500cc (30.50ci) side-valve engines
    • Senior TT: 500cc (30.50ci) overhead valve or 750cc (45.70ci) side-valve engines
    • Unlimited TT: 1000cc-1310cc (61ci-80ci) engines.

    1940

    • Melvin Rhoades (Harrisburg, PA) wins the Class C National Championship on the Springfield mile.

    1941

    Back To Top
    • Frenchie Castonguay (Springfield, IL) wins the Class C National Championship at the Springfield mile.

    • Tommy Hays sets the Class C record with 9 AMA Class C National wins.
      Misc Notes:
    • The AMA issues "Permanent National Numbers" for the first time to the top riders in the nation. Numbers 1-14, 16-17, 21-27, 29, 32-33, 35, 38, 55, and 72 are issued. In the October 1941 issue of The Motorcyclist, competition director E.C. Smith writes: "Effective at once, expert riders in dirt track racing have been assigned a permanent riding number. We feel that this will add something to the show as spectators will get to know the riders better and most of all, the riders won't have to have different numbers made up for each race meet. They can now get their numbers and carry them throughout the year. They can have on on their trailer, their mechanic's coveralls, etc. We ask that they adopt a uniform number at least ten inches, black on white background and also have a number for their right rear wheel. If they wish they can have three numbers, one for the front and both sides of the rear wheel or on the front and right of rear wheel."

    • Frenchie Castonaguay is the brother of 1935 & 1938 Class C National Champion Woodsie Castonaguay, marking the only time (as of 2015) that brothers have each won the National title.

    1942

    • No racing due to WWII

    1943

    • No racing due to WWII

    1944

    • No racing due to WWII

    1945

    • No racing due to WWII

    1946

    • Chet Dykgraaf (Grand Rapids, MI) wins the Class C National Championship on the Springfield mile.
      9

    1947

    • Jimmy Chann (Bridgeton, NJ) gives Harley-Davidson its first AMA Class C National Championship at the Springfield mile.
      16
      Competition Committee Notes for 1947:
    • AMA Competition Congress meets in Daytona Beach, FL February 19-20, 1947.
    • To address scoring issues with over 1600 professional competitors, a new "permanent number" system is created.
      • Three plates, at least 10" x 10" square, should be used. Numbers to be at least 8" tall.
      • "Straight numbers" (what are now known as "National Numbers") are assigned to Experts, National Champions, and a few Amateurs in each class (Racing, Hill Climbing, and Tourist Trophy).
      • The "letter system" divides the country up into alphabetical sections.
    • Wheels: Contestents must use the standard wheels that come as a specificed part of the Class C motorcycle.
    • New wording: Class C equipment shall have no alteration in bore, stroke, frame, forks, or type of motor. Alteration means brazing, cutting, or fabricating and thus the rider can use different types of forks, etc, provided they are not altered to fit.
    • Class C Hillclimb: New program will be four events: 45ci Novice, 80ci Novice, 45ci Expert, and 80ci Expert.
    • Class A Hillclimb: The winner of the Class B event at the National Championship automatically advances to Class A the following year.
    • Age Limit: A 15-year age limit on motorcycle used in competition [will] start in 1948. (So no motorcycle built prior to 1933 is eligible to compete in 1948).
    • Prize Money is standardized as follows:
      TT Racing
      • One-Star = $150 purse
      • Two-Star = $300 purse
      • Three-Star = $400 purse
      • Four-Star = $500 purse
      • Five-Star = $600 purse
      • Each additional "star" is another $100 in the purse.
      Dirt Track (half mile)
      • One-Star = $300 purse
      • Two-Star = $600 purse
      • Three-Star = $900 purse
      • Four-Star = $1,200 purse
      • Five-Star = $1,500 purse
      • Each additional "star" is another $300 in the purse.
      Dirt Track (mile)
      • One-Star = $1,000 purse
      • Two-Star = $1,500 purse
      • Three-Star = $2,000 purse
      • Four-Star = $2,500 purse
      • Five-Star = $3,000 purse
      • Each additional "star" is another $500 in the purse.
      Purse Breakdown
      • All events above one-star: 45% for Expert, 35% for Amateur, 20% for Novice.
      • All one-star events: 60% Amateur, 40% Novice. Experts will not compete at One-Star events.

    • "After the competition committee has classified the riders this winter, we will be in a position to institute the program of assigning riders with permanent riding numbers. Many riders have a 'pet' number and if they are assured of that number, they can have a set made up to the standard specifications and this will help in programming and adding more class to a motorcycle show....Chet Dykgraaf will wear #1 in track racing in 1947, while Herman Dahlke and Ray Tursky will wear #1 and #2 in TT racing." (AMA News, November 1, 1946).

    • AMA National Championship entry lists prior to 1947 do not show any district letters in use. Interestingly, the Number 1 followed by a district letter is assigned to several riders. This practice continues for several years.

    • The American Motorcyclist magazine's May 1947 issue includes a two-page explanation of the new "permanent" numbering system. What we now know as "National Numbers" are listed as "Straight numbers". The "district letter" is merely referred to as a "letter", stating the country is divided up into alphabetical sections and the riders residing in the particular section will carry a certain letter on their number plates". It also recommends that all number plates be at least 10" square. (American Motorcyclist, May 1947).

    • JAP wins its last dirt track National (Cordy Milne at Los Angeles, CA short track event).

    1948

    • Jimmy Chann (Bridgeton, NJ) wins his second consecutive AMA Class C National Championship at the Springfield mile. He is the first rider to successfully defend the Class C title.
      1

    • The only dead heat in AMA National history takes place at the August 8, 1948 10-mile Mile National at Lakewood Speedway in Atlanta, Georgia. Billy Huber and Bobby Hill finish tied for first.
      Misc Notes:
    • The AMA approves the Indian Scout for Class C competition

    • Class C number plates change from 10"x10" square to 10" high x 12" wide with 2-1/4" radiused corners, and a minimum 0.045" thickness. (American Motorcyclist, April 1948).

    • Novice and Amateur division riders begin using yellow number plates with black numbers and district letters (previously had used white number plates with black numbers and district letters since 1947).
      55N

    1949

    • Jimmy Chann (Bridgeton, NJ) wins his third consecutive AMA Class C National Championship at the Springfield mile.
      1
      Misc Notes:
    • The AMA approves the Harley-Davidson "WR", 750cc twin-cylinder side-valve hand-shift racing model, for Class C competition.

    1950

    • Rookie Expert Larry Headrick (San Jose, CA) wins the AMA Class C National Championship at the Springfield mile. He is the first rookie Expert ever to do so.
      87Y
      New OEM rule change:
    • A formal approval process for Class C equipment is created. Manufacturers are required to provide 25 complete motorcycles to the AMA for approval for Class C competition. The actual rulebook language reads:
        (b) "The manufacturer of the motorcycle must have sold or available for sale to the general public in the U.S.A. 25 or more of the motorcycle of the model in question, before it can be entered in any Class C Competition event. (c) the motorcycle, to be approved by the National Technical Committee must be basically the counterpart of a standard production model, regularly sold for every day use. (d) Each model of motorcycle as approved by the National Technical Committee, will be lsited, posted, and communicated to all Referees and will be the only models permitted to participate in Class C competitive events."

    1951

    Back To Top
    • Bobby Hill (Grove City, OH) wins the Class C National Championship at the Springfield mile.
      71
      Misc Notes:
    • Triumph wins its first dirt track National (Jimmy Phillips at Peoria, IL TT event).

    1952

    • Bobby Hill (Grove City, OH) wins his second consecutive Class C National Championship on the Springfield mile.
      1

    • Bobby Hill sets a Class C record by scoring five National wins during the year. Hill also ends the year tied with the late Tommy Hays for most career Class C National wins (9).
      Misc Notes:
    • The AMA approves the Harley-Davidson "KR", twin-cylinder, side-valve, foot-shift racing model, for Class C competition.

    • BSA wins its first AMA dirt track National (Al Gunter at Shreveport, LA half mile event).

    1953

    • Bill Tuman (Rockford, IL) wins the Class C National Championship on the Springfield mile.
      51

    • Bobby Hill finishes the season with 11 career AMA Class C National wins - a new record.
      Misc Notes:
    • Indian Motorcycle Company goes out of business

    • Novice division riders begin using green number plates with white numbers and district letters (previously had used yellow number plates with black numbers and district letters since 1948).
      99Z

    • Indian wins its last AMA dirt track National (Ernie Beckman at Williams Grove, PA half mile event).

    1954

    • Joe Leonard (San Jose, CA) wins the inaugural Grand National Championship, winning eight of the 18 rounds.
      98

    • Joe Leonard establishes new records for most consecutive AMA National wins (4) and most wins in a season (8).

    • Bobby Hill wins his twelfth and final AMA National (Daytona RR), establishing the new record for career Class C National wins.

    • Joe Leonard wins his twelfth AMA National (Hammond, IN HM) to tie Bobby Hill for most career AMA Class C National wins (12).
      Misc Notes
    • AMA creates the Grand National Championship series to award the National Championship to the rider who earns the most points in a series of events involving four racing disciplines: half mile, mile, "TT", and road racing. This "series" replaces the one-race championship system that dates back to the Class A era.

    • The AMA approves the BSA Gold Star for Class C competition.

    1955

    • Rookie Expert Brad Andres (San Diego, CA) wins the Grand National Championship - the only rookie rider ever to do so.
      11R

    • Andres wins the first Grand National event that he enters - the Daytona 200.

    • Brad Andres sets the record for wins during a rookie season with 5. This record has not come close to being broken as of 2015.

    • Joe Leonard finishes the season with 15 AMA Class C National wins, setting a new record.
      New TT Rule Change:
    • Class C 45 (TT): 500cc (30.50ci) overhead valve or 750cc (45.70ci) side-valve engines
    • Class C 80 (TT): 1213cc (74ci) overhead valve or 1310cc (80ci) side-valve engines.

    1956

    • Joe Leonard (San Jose, CA) wins his second Grand National Championship.
      98

    • Joe Leonard finishes the season with 17 career AMA Class C National wins (extending his record).
      Competition Committee Notes for the 1956 season:
    • They vote down a proposal to increase overhead valve engine displacement from 30.50ci (500cc) to 40ci (650cc).
    • They approve a proposal to limit engine compression to 9:1 on all engines.
    • They debates whether racing is worthwhile, due to public concerns over safety. They decide to limit the 1956 Grand National schedule to seven events, basically one of each 'type' of event: one 200-mile RR, one 10-mile HM, one 100-mile RR, one 25-mile M, one 20-mile M, one 45ci TT, and one 80ci TT.
    • For all 80ci classes, no motorcycles earlier than 1930 can be used. (1956 AMA Rule book)
    • AMA eliminates the Novice, Amateur, and Expert divisions in favor of Class B and Class A divisions. Novices and Amateurs are combined into the new Class B division, using yellow number plates with black numbers and district letters. Experts are redesignated as Class A riders, using white number plates with black numbers and district letters. (For continuity, the AMA continues using the Amateur and Expert designations at Grand National Championship events).

    1957

    • Joe Leonard (San Jose, CA) wins his third Grand National Championship, tying a record set by Jimmy Chan (1947-1949).
      1

    • Joe Leonard finishes the season with 21 career AMA Class C National wins (extending his record).

    1958

    • Carroll Resweber (Cedarburg, WI) wins his first Grand National Championship by a single point over defending champion Joe Leonard.
      12

    • Joe Leonard finishes the season with 23 career AMA Class C National wins (extending his record).
      Misc Notes:
    • Harley-Davidson riders begin using the XLRTT (883cc overhead valve Sportster) at the Peoria 80ci TT National.

    1959

    • Carroll Resweber (Cedarburg, WI) wins his second consecutive Grand National Championship.
      1
      Competition Committee Notes for the 1959 season::
    • AMA eliminates the Class A and Class B designations and returns to the Novice, Amateur and Expert divisions as they existed in 1955.
    • The AMA introduces the Probationary Novice division - a subdivision within the Novice division, for first-year professional racers. Probationary Novices (i.e. first-year Novices) use red number plates with white numbers and district letters, while other Novices continue to use green number plates with white numbers and district letters.
      99Z
      88Y


    • New short track rule change:
    • In the interests of safety, Santa Fe Speedway (Hinsdale IL) puts all riders on 250cc machines for their short track events (previously all competitors had raced 500cc overhead valve or 750c side-valve engines on the short tracks). The move is supported by Harley-Davidson, even though they do not have a competitive 250cc motorcycle. Most riders compete on BSA, Triumph, and NSU four-stroke 250cc singles.

    1960

    • Carroll Resweber (Cedarburg, WI) wins his third consecutive Grand National Championship. This ties the record set by Jimmy Chann (1947-1949), and shared, albeit non-consecutively, with Joe Leonard (1954, 1956-1957).
      1

    • Joe Leonard finishes the season with 24 career AMA Class C National wins (extending his record).
      Misc Notes:
    • Harley-Davidson buys 50% of Aermacchi's motorcycle division. Aermacchi is an Italian aircraft and motorcycle manufacturer. Harley-Davidson beging importing the company's single cylinder motorcycles in 1961.


    • Competition Committee Notes for the 1960 season::
    • "Once a rider shifts into high gear, he cannot shift gears except under a 'hold position' flag". This rule remains in the AMA Pro Racing rulebook through 1964.

    1961

    Back To Top
    • Carroll Resweber (Cedarburg, WI) wins an unprecedented fourth consecutive Grand National Championship.
      1

    • Joe Leonard wins his 27th and final career AMA National Class C event. His record will stand until 1971.

    • Carroll Resweber ties Joe Leonard's record of winning four consecutive AMA Grand National events (set in 1954).
      Misc Notes:
    • The Grand National Championship expands as Santa Fe Speedway (Hinsdale, IL) hosts the first-ever AMA short track Grand National. No Grand National points would be awarded for Short Track Nationals until 1964, however.

    • The AMA approves the BSA A65 - 650cc overhead valve twin - for Class C competition.

    • The AMA approves the Harley-Davidson CR-Sprint, a 250cc four-stroke single-cylinder, overhead-valve dirt tracker, for Class C competition.


    • Competition Committee Notes for the 1961 season::
    • Following Santa Fe Speedway's lead (see 1959), all short track equipment - Novice, Amateur, and Expert - is limited to 250cc displacement (previously had been 500cc overhead valve or 750cc side-valve since 1933). Interestingly, 250cc short track equipment is designated as Class A, not Class C.
    • Class C 45 TT renamed Formula C 45 TT. Retains 500cc (30.50ci) overhead valve or 750cc (45.70ci) side-valve engines format.
    • Class C 80 TT renamed Formula C 80 TT. Retains 1213cc (74ci) overhead valve or 1310cc (80ci) side-valve engines format.
    • Midway through the season, Ascot Park and AMA District 37 (Southern California) put all Novices on 250cc machines for safety.
    • "Compression is now unlimited but gasoline must be used, not over 100 octane and must be furnished by all promoting groups. All motors must be drained before riding the finals." - Jules Horky, Competition Director (December 1960 Competition Bulletin)

    1962

    • Bart Markel (Flint, MI) wins his first Grand National Championship after defending Champion and points leader Carroll Resweber is critically injured at the Round 12 (of 15) event in Lincoln, Illinois.
      4

    1963

    • Dick Mann (Richmond, CA) becomes the first privateer rider to win the Grand National Championship, as well as the first not claimed by a Harley-Davidson rider.
      64

      Misc Notes:
    • Matchless wins its first dirt track National (Dick Mann at Gardena, CA TT event, on a G50).

    • AMA begins testing the use of brakes on Novice bikes at Ascot Park.


    • Competition Committee Notes for the 1963 season::
    • Manufacturers are no longer required to submit 25 complete motorcycles to the AMA for approval (see 1950).
    • All Novice division half mile equipment is limited to 250cc displacement. Novice short track equipment was limited to 250cc displacement in 1961. Novice Road Race equipment continues to allow 500cc overhead valve or 750cc side-valve. Novice TT equipment follows the 250cc or 900cc rule, as listed below (lightweight & heavyweight)
    • New Class C 250 TT: 0-250cc engines. This replaces the Formula C 45 TT class from 1961.
    • New Class C Heavyweight TT: 251-900cc engines. This replaces the Formula C 80 TT class from 1961.

    1964

    • Roger Reiman (Kewanee, IL) wins the Grand National Championship.
      55
      Competition Committee Notes for the 1964 season:
    • AMA establishes a National Championship point fund for the first time, financed by three primary sources: $5 added to allentry fees, new $25 late entry fee, and each promoter donating 1% of their purse. The point fund was distributed to the top 20, with the winner receiving 25%, second plate 13%, third 8%.
    • The 250cc road racing class at National Championship events will be limited to Amateur and Expert riders only. No more Novices will compete.
    • AMA continues testing use of brakes on Novice bikes at Ascot Park.
    • AMA eliminates the rule requiring all National entries be pre-entered at least 21 days prior to the event. Starting in 1964, race-day entries will be permitted.
    • AMA discontinues the "ownership rule", which required a rider to show ownership papers of the motorcycle prior to entering a race.
    • AMA permits gear changes during oval races for the first time.
    • AMA permits tire cutting for dirt track racing, but not re-grooving or cutting. Tires may be ground uniformily without altering the basic tread design or pattern.
    • All Novice equipment is limited to 250cc maximum on all tracks. Short tracks had been 250cc since 1961; half miles since 1963.
    • Novices who do not acquire the necessary 20 advancement points can no longer request to be moved up to Amateur anyway. Prior to 1964, Novices who acquired as few as 5 points could request to be moved up to Amateur.
    • All 250cc short track equipment is re-designated as Class C (had been Class A since 1961). Jules Horky (AMA Competition Director) reminds everyone that "home-made frames are illegal. Rule now states that frame must be manufactured for the machine in question by the manufacturer." (March 1964 competition bulletin)

    • "Not all national numbers are assigned to winners of nationals or high point riders. Appearance of rider, his equipment, his attitude, and cooperation with officials and promoters are all taken in consideration. There are experts today who have NEVER won a major event but they are a credit to the sport of motorcycles" - Jules Horky, Competition Director (July 1964 Competition Bulletin).

    1965

    • Bart Markel (Flint, MI) wins his second Grand National Championship.
      4
      Misc Notes:
    • Yamaha scores its first Grand National win (Dick Mann at Nelson Ledges, OH road race event, on a TD1-B). This event is the only Grand National road race event in history to run with 250cc machinery.

    • Matchless scores its last Grand National win (Dick Mann in Carpentersville, IL road race event, on a G50).


    • Competition Committee Notes for 1965 Season:
    • The AMA Competition Committee meets in October 1964 and votes down a proposal to limit all Expert and Amateur engines to 350cc. Instead, they agree on a proposal to increase all Expert and Amateur engines to 750cc, limited to SOHC, two cylinders maximum, two-valve, four-speed, with plan to revisit in 1965 and implement in 1967. This proposal passes by a 23-3 vote.
    • Manufacturers are requires to submit 100 complete motorcycles to the AMA to be approved for competition. (Previously had not required any complete motorcycles since 1963).
    • New rule requires a mandatory pit stop for all races over 100 miles. This rule is created for safety - to limit the oversized fuel tanks that some riders were using.
    • The rule about remaining in high gear, which was added to the AMA Pro Racing rulebook in 1960, is removed. No further mention of shifting is ever included in an AMA Pro Racing rulebook.
    • New rule implements the "double" starting line in an effort to improve the poor starts (January 1965 Competition Bulletin). These lines shall be two feet apart (February 1965 Competition Bulletin).
    • Class C 250 TT class is renamed the Class C Lightweight TT. It retains the 0-250cc engine format.
    • Class C Heavyweight TT remains unchanged, with 251-900cc engine format.

    • "How do Expert riders receive National numbers? Several ways, sometimes winners of Nationals, sometimes the clean and co-operative Expert, the high point flat track Amateur, last year several high point Amateurs in different sections of the USA were assigned National numbers who have thus far been very active and we also try to place National numbers in all sections or States, so don't write and tell AMA, I intend to be active next year, please assign a National number" - Jules Horky, Competition Director (September 1965 Competition Bulletin).

    1966

    • Bart Markel (Flint, MI) wins his third Grand National Championship.
      1

    • Bart Markel completes the career "Hit For The Cycle / Dirt Track Slam" by winning the Hinsdale, IL short track event.
      Misc Notes:
    • Peoria, IL drops its "twin" TT Nationals, in favor of a single "heavyweight" (900cc) TT National.

    • "In past years, only rider was suspended when equipment was found illegal, now owner will also be suspended for one (1) year and restricted from pit area during his suspension" - Jules Horky (December 1965 Competition Bulletin).

    • Swede Savage places sixth in the Daytona short track final (non-National) on a two-stroke Montesa; possibly the first success of a short tracking two-stroke.

    • Dick Mann first learns of a device that his friend had developed for slowing two-stroke bikes down on steep downhill sections of a desert race or enduro. He shows it to Neil Keen and John Lund (Keen's sponsor). The device eventually becomes known as a compression release.


    • Competition Committee Notes for 1966 Season:
    • The AMA Competition Committee meets in October 1965 and decides to limit all dirt track and road race engines - Experts and Amateurs - to 350cc, 5-speed, air-cooled, 200 units required for approval, to be implemented in 1969 season and remain in effect through the 1971 season. This proposal passes in a 22-2 vote. Reportedly, Triumph and BSA, which each lack a competitive 350cc engine, are unhappy with the decision. Harley-Davidson reportedly begins plans to ship 350cc Sprint (ERS) engines from Italy to arrive in time for the 1969 season.
    • A motion to add brakes to all dirt track equipment is defeated 15-8.

    1967

    • Gary Nixon (Cockeysville, MD) scores his first Grand National Championship, and only the second not claimed by a Harley-Davidson rider.
      9
      Misc Notes:
    • Dick Mann and Neil Keen begin using compression releases on their 250cc two-stroke short track bikes. Their Bultaco short trackers for the Daytona races are equipped with the compression releases. Dick Mann wins the race.

    • The AMA approves the first-ever aftermarket racing frame for Class C competition - the Sonicweld rigid frame.

    1968

    • Gary Nixon (Cockeysville, MD) scores his second consecutive Grand National Championship.
      1

    • Sammy Tanner finishes eleventh at the 7/14/1968 Portland (OR) Mile on a YR2 350cc twin built by Dennis Mahan. It marks the first-ever Grand National dirt track mile appearance for a two-stroke engine.
      7

    • Yvon DuHamel finishes sixth at the 9/15/1968 Sacramento Mile on a YR2 350cc twin. It marks the highest Grand National dirt track mile finish for a two-stroke engine to date.
      41T

    • Phil Read, England's Grand Prix World Champion (who would win the 1968 125cc & 250cc World Championships), competes at the Daytona 200. He finishes 11th.
      51
      Misc Notes:
    • Triumph scores its last short track National win (Gary Nixon at Houston, TX).

    • Neil Keen (Sonicweld Yamaha DT1) and Dick Mann (DMR Ossa) compete at the Daytona short track races with compression releases.

    • The AMA issues a competition bulletin in June of 1968 that qualifies a compression release as a "braking device" and is therefore illegal for the remainder of the 1968 season.


    • Competition Congress Notes for 1968 season:
    • The AMA Competition Congress replaces the AMA Competition Committee, and meets in October 1967.
    • They agree to delay the implementation of the 350cc rule until 1971.
    • Manufacturers are now required to submit 200 complete motorcycles to the AMA to be approved for competition. (Previously had required 100 complete motorcycles since 1965).
    • Motion to add one braking device to the rear wheels in all forms of dirt track racing (for the 1969 season). Motion tabled.
    • Motion to allow the use of compression releases on two-stroke engines (for the 1969 season). Amended to allow a braking device (except a front wheel brake). Amended to make it optional. Motion carried.

    1969

    • Mert Lawwill (San Francisco, CA) claims the Grand National Championship.
      18

    • Jim Rice wins the Sedalia Mile on a BSA Rocket III on August 24, 1969. It is the only Grand National dirt track win ever for a three-cylinder motorcycle.
      24

    • David Aldana wins the Nazareth (PA) Amateur Mile National on a BSA Rocket III on May 17, 1969. It marks the first significant dirt track win ever for a three-cylinder motorcycle. It is the same motorcycle that Jim Rice would win Sedalia on just three months later.
      38X

    • Art Baumann wins the Sonoma (CA) Grand National Road Race on a Suzuki TR500. It marks the first Grand National "big bike" win for a two-stroke motorcycle.
      71

    • Barry Briggs, New Zealand's four-time World Speedway Champion, competes at both Grand National short track events. He rides a BSA-powered speedway machine at Houston, and a Yamaha two-stroke twin in a speedway frame at Santa Fe. Briggs runs competitively, but does not make the final at either round.
      78X
      Misc Notes:
    • The AMA approves the BSA Rocket III - three-cylinder four-stroke overhead valve 750cc - for Class C competition.

    • Bultaco scores its first dirt track National (Ronnie Rall at Houston, TX short track event).

    • The Harley-Davidson "750 Sportster" is tentatively approved for competition, pending the receipt of documents and inspection of all 200 units.

    • Ossa scores its first dirt track National win (Dick Mann at Hinsdale, IL short track event).

    • Mert Lawwill wins the final AMA National for the KR engine at the season finale at Ascot Park.

    • The Mikuni VM round-slide carburetor first appears on the Yamaha TD2 250cc two-stroke twin

    • The AMA approves the first-ever aftermarket racing frame with twin-shock rear suspension for Class C competition, built by Trackmaster.


    • Competition Congress Notes for the 1969 season:
    • The AMA Competition Congress meets in October 1968.
    • All professional Amateur & Expert dirt track and speedway engines may be 750cc, regardlesss of configuration or valve style. This finally eliminates the 250cc penalty for overhead valve engines that had existed since 1933. Most British manufacturers begin using 650cc overhead valve engines immediately, and begin developing 750cc versions for competition.
      • Rod Coates, representing Triumph, recommends cancelling the planned move to 350cc for all racing engines on January 1, 1969, and instead proposes that the all professional dirt track and speedway racing displace up to 650cc for Experts and Amateurs. Walter Davidson, representing Harley-Davidson, proposes amending displacement limit from 650cc to 750cc. This motion passes by a 27-15 vote. Walter Davidson proposes amending the effective date of the rule change from January 1, 1969 to January 1, 1970. This motion loses in a 19-24 vote. The 750cc amendment with January 1969 effective date is voted on again, and passes 23-20.
    • AMA rulebook permits brakes for the first time, stating that "In Dirt Track, short track, and speedway races, a braking device affecting the rear wheel (but not the front wheel) may be used".
    • Compression releases may be installed on two-cycle engines, reversing the competition bulletin from the previous June.
    • AMA finally stops using the confusing "distance championships" for half mile Nationals. Going forward, all half mile Nationals run a standard 20-lap / 10-mile length. Miles, Road Race, and TT Nationals continue to have different distances.


    • Editorial comments on the 750cc rule change:
    • Comment 1: It appears that since there were so few road races at the time that the Competition Congress focused solely on dirt track rules, and left the road race engines with the antiquated 500cc limit for overhead valve and two-stroke engines.
    • Comment 2: The change of heart concerning the 350cc rule seems to stem from the Yamaha YR1 350cc two-stroke twin, which was approved in 1967. The "little" 350cc engine was proving to be very quick at road races - especially Daytona - against their 500cc/750cc challengers, and there was concern that smaller four-stroke engines would be unable to keep pace.
    • Comment 3: Triumph recommended raising the 350cc limit to 650cc, since Triumph and BSA already had competent 650cc TT engines, and they knew that Harley-Davidson did not produce a 650cc motorcycle. Reportedly, Walter Davidson consulted quickly with Bart Markel, who confirmed that there was no feasible way to convert the XLR overhead valve engine (883cc) down to 650cc displacement. Hence, Davidson counter-proposed to allow the overhead engines the same 750cc displacement of the side valve engines, but also proposed delaying the implementation one year - until 1970 - to give Harley-Davidson time to develop the overhead valve engine. The Congress accepted the 750cc proposal, but not the one year delay. Recall that the 350cc limit was expected to go into effect January 1, 1969 - only three months after the October 1968 Congress.
      Factory Teams
      2
      Dick Mann
      84
      Eddie Wirth
      80Y
      Jim Rice
      3
      Fred Nix
      4
      Bart Markel
      18
      Mert Lawwill
      22
      Dan Haaby
      25
      Cal Rayborn
      55
      Roger Reiman
      87
      Mark Brelsford
      66R
      Walt Fulton III
      61Z
      Ron Grant
      (RR only)
      70X
      Art Baumann
      (RR only)
      1
      Gary Nixon
      5
      Larry Palmgren
      20
      Gene Romero
      32
      Dusty Coppage
      38
      Chuck Palmgren

    1970

    • Gene Romero (San Luis Obispo, CA) wins the Grand National Championship.
      3

    • Mert Lawwill completes the career "Hit For The Cycle / Dirt Track Slam" by winning the Houston, TX short track event.

    • Bart Markel wins his 27th career Grand National event, tying the Class C record set by Joe Leonard for career wins.

    • Don Castro finishes third at the Nazareth, PA mile event on a Rob North-framed Triumph Trident. It marks the highest Grand National dirt track finish ever for the Triumph triple.

    • Ivan Mauger, England's defending World Speedway Champion, competes at the Houston short track Grand National event.
      60T

    • Barry Briggs, New Zealand's four-time World Speedway Champion, competes at the Grand National short track events. He rides a Yamaha two-stroke twin at Houston and Sante Fe. He won his heat race in Houston but faltered in the semi, and pulled over while leading his heat race at Santa Fe due to a multi-rider crash that nearly blocked the track, and missed transfering to the semi.
      70T
      Misc Notes:
    • BSA scores its last half mile National win (Dave Aldana at Terre Haute, IN).

    • The AMA approves the Harley-Davidson "XR", a 750cc V-twin overhead valve engine, for Class C competition on Feburary 27, 1970. It had been tentatively approved in 1969 a the "750 Sportster", but it lacked having 200 units available for inspection at the time. It is dubbed the "iron XR", due to its steel cylinders and heads.

    • Honda scores its first Grand National win (Dick Mann at Daytona, FL road race event).

    • Triumph scores its last road race National win (Gary Nixon at Loudon, NH)

    • Yamaha scores its first dirt track National win (Chuck Palmgren at Nazareth, PA mile event).

    • Mid-season, the AMA approves the Triumph T120/RT, a bored-out 750cc version of their 650cc parallel twin engine, for Class C competition. The engine helps propel Romero to the Grand National title.

    • The AMA approves the Yamaha XS650, a 650cc parallel twin overhead valve engine for Class C competition.

    • No Harley-Davidsons make the final at the July 5, 1970 San Jose Half Mile National.

    • No Harley-Davidsons survive to the end of the August 23, 1970 Peoria TT. Mark Brelsford is the only H-D pilot to make the final, and was running third when his bike expired. He finished 9th.


    • Competition Congress Notes for 1970 season:
    • All professional Amateur & Expert road race engines may be 750cc, regardlesss of configuration or valve style. John Harley submits a position paper to the 1969 Competition Committee stating the several members of the committee vote 'no' on the question of 750cc for road racing, citing safety concerns, particularly at courses like Daytona and Talladega,
    • Heavweight RR class for Expert and Amateur riders, displacement limited to 251cc minimum, 750cc maximum.
    • Lightweight RR class for Expert and Amateur combined and Novice class, with maximum displacement of 360cc, except two-stroke twin cylinder engines which are limited to 250cc.
    • Mandatory fuel stops at road race events are no longer required.
    • Advancement points change: now require 40 points to move from Novice to Amateur, and 80 points to move from Amateur to Expert.
    • To be approved (for Class C competition), a motorcycle must be a standard catalogued production model and at least 200 of this same model with identical engines and transmissions must be available for inspection and/or purchase within the United States.
    • National Numbers will no longer be awarded to first-year Experts.
    • In order to maintain a National Number, a rider must finish in the top 100 in National standings.
    • No USA rider may be issued a license other than a Novice license on a first-time basis, or advanced in classes without unanimous endorsement of two Competition Congress members and the District Referee. All must be familiar with the rider and why a rider should be allowed to pass up the Novice or Amateur class.
    • Riders from foreign countries will be granted on Expert licenses. Rider applying for license shall have the equivalent rating in his own association.
    • Motorcycles must be equipped with a self-closing throttle, and with the exception of Hillclimbs, motorcycles must be equipped with an electrical and/or mechanical ignition cut-off switch or button.
      Factory Teams
      2
      Dick Mann
      24
      Jim Rice
      38X
      Dave Aldana
      14N
      Ken Pressgrove
      1
      Mert Lawwill
      4
      Bart Markel
      25
      Cal Rayborn
      87
      Mark Brelsford
      21T
      Dave Sehl
      34E
      Rex Beauchamp
      2
      Dick Mann
      (Daytona 200
      RR only)
      30
      Art Baumann
      (RR only)
      58
      Jody Nicholas
      (RR only)
      61
      Ron Grant
      (RR only)
      3
      Gene Romero
      9
      Gary Nixon
      11Y
      Don Castro
      6
      Chuck Palmgren
      22
      Dan Haaby
      (RR only)
      32
      Dusty Coppage
      30X
      Keith Mashburn
      97
      Ron Pierce
      (RR only)
      5T
      Yvon Duhamel
      (RR only)

    1971

    Back To Top
    • Dick Mann (Richmond, CA) wins his second Grand National Championship eight years after winning his first, a previously unheard of record.
      4

    • John Hateley earns the first-ever Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      43R

    • Bart Markel wins his 28th career Grand National to set a new record for career Grand National/Class C wins.

    • Barry Briggs, New Zealand's four-time World Speedway Champion, competes at the Grand National short track events. Briggs qualified third on his Yamaha twin at Houston but did not make the final. At Santa Fe, he made the final, and ran up front early before fading to a 10th-place finish.
      7T
      Misc Notes:
    • Near the end of the year, the AMA approves the BSA A70L, a stroked-out 750cc version of the twin-cylinder A65, for Class C competition.

    • The AMA approves the Yamaha GXS-1, a bored-out 750cc version of the XS650.

    • BSA also scores its last AMA road race win (John Cooper at Ontario, CA).

    • The Yamaha GXS-1 scores its first half mile dirt track National (Jim Odom at Corona, CA).


    • Competition Congress Notes for the 1971 season:
    • Amateur division renamed to "Junior" division. Junior division continues to use yellow (or orange) number plates with black numbers and district letter.
    • National Number assignments are changed. All National Numbers are assigned based on the final 1970 Grand National Championship point standings.
    • The Probationary Novice division is eliminated after the 1970 season.
    • Novice division riders begin using white number plates with red numbers and district letters.
      99Z
      Factory Teams
      2
      Jim Rice
      3
      Dave Aldana
      4
      Dick Mann
      25
      Don Emde
      21T
      John Cooper
      (RR only)
      6
      Mert Lawwill
      7
      Mark Brelsford
      14
      Cal Rayborn
      16
      Dave Sehl
      32
      Bart Markel
      34E
      Rex Beauchamp
      23
      Jody Nicholas
      (Select DT
      events only)
      90
      Mel Lacher
      (Select DT
      events only)
      23
      Jody Nicholas
      (RR only)
      30
      Art Baumann
      (RR only)
      37
      Ron Pierce
      (RR only)
      42
      Ron Grant
      (RR only)
      1
      Gene Romero
      5
      Don Castro
      9
      Tom Rockwood
      10
      Gary Nixon

    1972

    • Mark Brelsford (Woodside, CA) wins the Grand National Championship.
      87

    • Gary Scott claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      64R

    • Harley-Davidson claims the first-ever "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship", which compiles the highest finish of each brand at every Grand National Championship event.

    • Dick Mann becomes the first rider to complete the career "Grand Slam" (winning at least one short track, one TT, one half mile, one mile, and one road race Grand National event) by winning the Homewood, IL mile event.

    • Barry Briggs, New Zealand's four-time World Speedway Champion, takes our an AMA license but it is unclear if he competes at any of the Grand National short track events.
      70T
      Misc Notes:
    • BSA scores its last mile National win (Dick Mann in Homewood, IL).

    • The AMA approves the Harley-Davidson XR750, an updated version of the XR, for Class C competition on April 12, 1972. The updated engine uses aluminum cylinders and heads to address the overheating issues that plagued the XR model. Due to delays in getting all 200 units completed, it is not approved in time for the Daytona 200, but debuts at the Colorado Springs national on April 30.

    • Ossa scores its last dirt track National win (Mike Gerald at Hinsdale, IL short track event).

    • Goodyear introduces the DT-I tire, specifically designed for dirt track use.


    • Competition Congress Notes for the 1972 season:
    • The Junior division no longer competes at every Grand National Championship event; however, select Grand National Championship events run a "Junior Invitational" instead.
    • Minimum age for a Professional license is lowered from 18 to 16 years.
    • The National Number assignments are changed.
      • National Number 1 continues to be reserved for the defending Grand National Champion
      • National Numbers 2 through 9 are now reserved for former Grand National Champions
      • National Numbers 10 through 99 are assigned on an annual basis, with most riders choosing to keep the same number year after year.
      Factory Teams
      1
      Dick Mann
      35
      John Cooper
      (RR only)
      4
      Bart Markel
      7
      Mert Lawwill
      14
      Cal Rayborn
      16
      Dave Sehl
      31
      Rex Beauchamp
      87
      Mark Brelsford
      84Y
      Scott Brelsford
      30
      Art Baumann
      (RR only)
      58
      Jody Nicholas
      (RR only)
      61
      Ron Grant
      (RR only)
      3
      Gene Romero
      64R
      Gary Scott
      18
      Jim Odom
      19
      Keith Mashburn
      73
      Kel Carruthers
      (RR only)
      80Y
      Kenny Roberts

    1973

    • Kenny Roberts (Modesto, CA) wins the Grand National Championship, the first ever for a Japanese brand.
      80

    • Scott Brelsford claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      84Y

    • Yamaha claims the "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Eighteen different riders score Grand National wins, breaking the previous record of 16 (set in 1972).

    • A record of 1.50 events-to-winners-ratio (18 winners in 24 events) breaks the previous record (1.43 ratio set in 1958).

    • 1973 Regional Champions
      29
      Larry PalmgrenFreehold, NJEastern Expert
      20R
      Hank ScottHixton, TNEastern Junior
      88D
      Greg SassamanMacon, GAEastern Novice
      31
      Rex BeauchampMilford, MICentral Expert
      58N
      Phil McDonaldSapulpa, OKCentral Junior
      80M
      Ed DaleyTulsa, OKCentral Novice
      35
      Randy SkiverEverett, WAWestern Expert
      76Y
      John GennaiLos Gatos, CAWestern Junior
      88Y
      Nick NazzisiSan Jose, CAWestern Novice
      Misc Notes:
    • BSA ceases its factory effort after the 1972 season as the company nears bankruptcy.

    • Triumph scores its last Mile dirt track National (Gene Romero at San Jose, CA).

    • AMA introduces the "Regional" series for East, West, and Central division races.


    • Competition Congress notes for the 1973 season:
    • Novice division engines on all tracks may now be 360cc engines (had been 250cc limit since 1961). Exception for multi-cylinder two-stroke engines, which remain limited to 250cc.
    • Junior & Expert short track equipment may now be 360cc engines, except for multi-cylinder two-stroke engines, which remain limited to 250cc. (Short track equipment had been limited to 250cc displacement since 1961).
    • Junior & Expert TT equipment limited to 750cc maximum (had been 900cc since 1963).
      Factory Teams
      1
      Mark Brelsford
      (injured in March)
      7
      Mert Lawwill
      14
      Cal Rayborn
      16
      Dave Sehl
      31
      Rex Beauchamp
      84Y
      Scott Brelsford
      24
      Jim Rice
      (June addition)
      17
      Yvon Duhamel
      (RR only)
      26
      Cliff Carr
      (RR only)
      30
      Art Baumann
      (RR only)
      51X
      Hurley Wilvert
      (RR only)
      61
      Ron Grant
      (RR only)
      8R
      Paul Smart
      (RR only)
      ??
      Geoff Perry
      (RR only)
      2
      Dick Mann
      3
      Gene Romero
      64
      Gary Scott
      11
      Don Castro
      21
      Gary Fisher
      73
      Kel Carruthers
      (RR only)
      80
      Kenny Roberts

    1974

    • Kenny Roberts (Modesto, CA) wins his second consecutive Grand National Championship.
      1

    • Hank Scott claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      20R

    • Yamaha claims its second "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Kenny Roberts is the second rider to complete the career "Grand Slam" by winning the Peoria, IL TT event.

    • 1974 Regional Champions
      41
      Billy EvesPhoenixville, PAEastern Expert
      80C
      Greg SassamanMacon, GAEastern Junior
      155C
      Jeff PurvisMorrow, GAEastern Novice
      62
      Corky KeenerFlint, MICentral Expert
      65X
      Jay SpringsteenFlint, MICentral Junior
      174N
      Larry BeallSan Antonio, TXCentral Novice
      70
      Mark WilliamsSpringfield, ORWestern Expert
      78Z
      Bruce HanlonRedwood City, CAWestern Junior
      216Y
      Mark SmithDublin, CAWestern Novice
      Misc Notes:
    • Camel cigarettes sponsors three Grand National events - Laguna Seca RR, Santa Fe ST, and Terre Haute HM - awarding $15,000 in total prize money.

    • Honda wins its first dirt track National (Mike Gerald at Houston, TX short track event)

    • Triumph wins its last half mile dirt track National (Mike Kidd in Columbus, OH)

    • The AMA approves the Yamaha TZ700, a four-cylinder two-stroke engine, for Class C competition.


    • Competition Congress Notes for the 1974 season:
    • Grand National road racing events begin running a Superbike class featuring production-based motorcycles.
    • They consider adding restrictors for 750cc bikes at Grand National road racing events, but decide against it.
    • The first-ever noise level limits for professional racing are implemented for the Golden Gate National in Albany, CA: 92dba at 50 feet.
    • The AMA Pro Racing district letter system is revamped.
      • Most Novices hold new numbers between 70 and 299 followed by their new district letter.
      • Juniors and Experts continue to use single-digit and two-digit numbers followed by their new district letter.
      • Some of the district letter reassignments are:
        • Wisconsin changes from "G" to "K"
        • Michigan changes from "E" to "X"
        • Oklahoma changes from "M" to "G"
        • California loses "X", gains "E", and retains "R", "Y", and "Z".
        • Illinois loses "S", but retains "P"
        • One plausible explanation (offered by former National #36 Charlie Chapple) was that scoring could be compromised when bordering states had similar-looking letters. Examples: Michigan (E) and Ohio (F), Oklahoma (M) and Texas (N), and Southern California had both (X and Y).
          14E
          14F
          11M
          11N
          8X
          8Y

      Factory Teams
      6
      Mark Brelsford
      7
      Mert Lawwill
      19
      Scott Brelsford
      31
      Rex Beauchamp
      64
      Gary Scott
      15
      Mike Gerald
      Houston ST only
      23
      Dave Hansen
      Houston ST only
      16Y
      John Gennai
      Houston ST only
      31Z
      Rick Hocking
      Houston ST only
      17
      Yvon Duhamel
      (RR only)
      30
      Art Baumann
      (RR only)
      39
      Hurley Wilvert
      (RR only)
      13
      Dave Aldana
      9
      Gary Nixon
      26
      Cliff Carr
      33
      Paul Smart
      72
      Mike Kidd
      1
      Kenny Roberts
      3
      Gene Romero
      11
      Don Castro

    1975

    • Gary Scott (Springfield, OH) wins the Grand National Championship.
      64

    • Jay Springsteen claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      65X

    • Yamaha claims its second "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Kenny Roberts scores the first-ever "Grand Slam" in a single calendar year.
      1

    • Scott Brelsford wins the AMA Expert Regional Mile in Stockton, CA on July 6, 1975 on an Irv Kanamoto-tuned Kawasaki H2 triple. It is the first-ever AMA dirt track win in history for a two-stroke multi-cylinder engine (albeit not a Grand National).
      19

    • Kenny Roberts wins the Indy Mile on August 23, 1975 on the Yamaha TZ750 four-cylinder. It is the first-ever AMA dirt track Grand National win in history for a two-stroke multi-cylinder engine.
      1

    • Diane Cox becomes the first woman to hold an AMA Expert dirt track license.
      66Q

    • 1975 Regional Champions
      41
      Billy EvesBirchrunville, PAEastern Expert
      47S
      Tom NorrisCockeysville, MDEastern Junior
      76U
      Garth BrowRichland, NJEastern Novice
      92
      Steve DrosteFlint, MICentral Expert
      84X
      Ted BoodyDeWitt, MICentral Junior
      162K
      John EllisKenosha, WICentral Novice
      70
      Mark WilliamsSpringfield, ORWestern Expert
      76Z
      Steve EklundSan Jose, CAWestern Junior
      156Z
      Ted DavidsonModesto, CAWestern Novice
      Misc Notes:
    • Camel cigarettes sponsors the entire Grand National Championship, the first series sponsor in history. The series is renamed the Camel Pro Series.

    • Corky Keener joins the Harley-Davidson factory team at the June 7, 1975 Louisville Half Mile. Cycle News East reported on June 10: "Corky Keener and Bart Markel have gone their separate ways. The Keener-ridden/Markel-prepared H-D combination was almost unbeatable last year, but reported friction between the two caused the split. Keener will reportedly receive direct help from the factory, while Markel, at least at the May 31 Northville Downs rainout, has Junior Ted Boody on his bike."

    • Triumph ceases its factory dirt track effort after the 1974 season as the company nears bankruptcy. The dirt track team is merged into the Norton-Villiers-Triumph squad. Triumph engines continue to be produced in very small quantities until 1983.

    • Norton-Villiers-Triumph ceases its factory team on August 1.

    • The AMA approves the Harley-Davidson MX250 single-cylinder two-stroke off-road motorcycle for Class C competition.

    • The AMA approves the Yamaha TZ750 - a 750cc version of the four-cylinder, two-stroke TZ700 that it introduced in 1974 - for Class C competition.


    • Competition Congress Notes for the 1975 season:
    • Upon a request from Norton, the AMA Competition Committee lowers the manufacturer's requirement for approving a motorcycle for Class C competition from 200 complete motorcycles to one complete motorcycle and 24 engines. (The previous rule was set in 1968). Norton wanted to get into Formula 750 racing, so they lobbied the ACU (Auto-Cycle Union) in the UK, who went to the FIM, who brought it to the AMA. This rule allowed Norton to use their short-stroke twin in Formula 750 racing, but also allowed Yamaha to introduce the OW72 in 1976, the XV750 in 1981, and allowed Honda to develop the NS750 and RS750.
      Factory Teams
      20
      John Gennai
      (ST only)
      50
      Guy McClure
      (ST only)
      7
      Mert Lawwill
      31
      Rex Beauchamp
      64
      Gary Scott
      80C
      Greg Sassamann
      (injured in August)
      62
      Corky Keener
      (June addition)
      65X
      Jay Springsteen
      (August addition)
      17
      Yvon Duhamel
      (RR only)
      27
      Jim Evans
      (RR only)
      25
      Rob Morrison
      70
      Mark Williams
      98
      John Hateley
      9
      Gary Nixon
      (RR only)
      10
      Dave Aldana
      (RR only)
      39
      Hurley Wilvert
      (RR only)
      1
      Kenny Roberts
      3
      Gene Romero
      (RR only)
      11
      Don Castro
      (RR only)

    1976

    • Jay Springsteen (Lapeer, MI) wins his first Grand National Championship.
      25

    • Steve Eklund claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      74Z

    • Yamaha claims its third "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Randy Cleek claims the unofficial AMA Formula 750 (Grand National road race) title.

    • 1976 Regional Champions
      41
      Billy EvesBirchrunville, PAEastern Expert
      7A
      Willie CrabbeLevittown, PAEastern Junior
      203C
      Lance JonesGadsden, ALEastern Novice
      92
      Steve DrosteFlint, MICentral Expert
      30X
      Randy GossHartland, MICentral Junior
      288X
      Mike RhoadsAlma, MICentral Novice
      60
      Chuck JoynerOregon City, ORWestern Expert
      56Z
      Ted DavidsonModesto, CAWestern Junior
      111R
      Eddie LawsonOntario, CAWestern Novice
      Misc Notes:
    • Camel cigarettes again sponsors the Grand National Championship as the Camel Pro Series.

    • Defending Grand National Champion Gary Scott defends his title as a privateer after failing to agree to a new contract with the Harley-Davidson Motor Company.

    • Goodyear introduces the DT-II second-generation tire specially designed for dirt track use. The tire - originally offered in 3.50x19 size - is based on the road race 'rain tires' that Kenny Roberts tried on some dirt track events in 1975. Supply issues resulted in the tires being outlawed at some AMA Grand National events, for fairness reasons.

    • Evel Knievel sponsors Gene Romero (#3).

    • Bultaco wins its last dirt track National (Terry Poovey at Talladega, AL short track event).

    • Yamaha wins its last half mile dirt track National (Kenny Roberts at Terre Haute, IN).

    • The AMA approves the Yamaha OW72, an updated version of the GXS-1 750cc parellel twin engine, for Class C competition. The bike debuts at the May 16, 1976 San Jose mile, with Kenny Roberts and Skip Aksland. Roberts makes the final, but the bike refuses to run for the final.

    • The AMA approves the Harley-Davidson MX360, a 360cc version of its MX250 two-stroke single, for Class C competition.

    • The AMA changes its name from the American Motorcycle Association to the American Motorcyclist Association, and updates its logo for the first time since 1924.

    • Competition Congress Notes for the 1976 season:
    • Junior & Expert division competition on half mile, mile, and TT are limited to single and twin-cylinder engines only. Since this rule change addresses configuration, and not displacement, the rule change goes into effect January 1, 1976.
    • The Competition Committee agrees to move Novice and Junior/Expert short track displacement back to 250cc for the 1977 season.
    • The Grand National Championship adopts a new points scheme to be used at all events: 20-16-13-11-10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1.
      Factory Teams
      7
      Mert Lawwill
      21
      Greg Sassamann
      25
      Jay Springsteen
      31
      Rex Beauchamp
      62
      Corky Keener
      2
      Kenny Roberts

    1977

    • Jay Springsteen (Lapeer, MI) wins his second consecutive Grand National Championship.
      1

    • Scott Pearson claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      42Y

    • Harley-Davidson claims its second "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Kenny Roberts claims the unofficial AMA Formula One (Grand National road race) title.

    • Jay Springsteen completes the career "Hit For The Cycle / Dirt Track Slam" by winning the Hinsdale, IL TT event.

    • 1977 Regional Champions
      14
      Hank ScottFindlay, OHEastern Expert
      23C
      Lance JonesGadsden, ALEastern Junior
      174C
      Travis SmithKernersville, NCEastern Novice
      30X
      Randy GossHartland, MICentral Expert
      35X
      Bobby DeckerBattle Creek, MICentral Junior
      266G
      Ronnie JonesOklahoma City, OKCentral Novice
      35
      Randy SkiverEverett, WAWestern Expert
      10Y
      Jim MertensSonoma, CAWestern Junior
      246Y
      Ray DuganEureka, CAWestern Novice
      Misc Notes:
    • Camel cigarettes sponsors the Grand National Championship as the Camel Pro Series.

    • Goodyear introduces the 4.00x19 version of its DT-II dirt track tire.

    • Evel Knievel sponsors Gary Scott (#5).


    • Competition Congress Notes for the 1977 season:
    • AMA Pro Rulebook requires the use of brakes for the first time, stating that "brakes must be used".
    • Novice division (all tracks) equipment limited to 250cc single-cylinder engines (previously had been 360cc engines or 250cc two-stroke multi-cylinder engines since 1973).
    • Junior & Expert short track equipment limited to 250cc single-cylinder engines (previously had been 360cc engines or 250cc two-stroke multi-cylinder engines since 1973).
      Factory Teams
      1
      Jay Springsteen
      12
      Ted Boody
      62
      Corky Keener
      2
      Kenny Roberts

    1978

    • Jay Springsteen (Lapeer, MI) wins his third consecutive Grand National Championship.
      1

    • Lance Jones claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      23C

    • Harley-Davidson claims its third "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Mike Baldwin claims the unofficial AMA Formula One (Grand National road race) title.

    • Hank Scott records the first qualifying lap over 100mph (35.956 sec = 100.122mph) on a one-mile dirt track at DuQuoin, IL, July 30, 1978.

    • 1978 Regional Champions
      96
      Bill SchaefferPine Grove, PAEastern Expert
      8L
      Scott ParkerCumberland City, TNEastern Junior
      70AA
      Jim BrethauerDownington, PAEastern Novice
      80
      Phil DarcyPeoria Heights, ILCentral Expert
      98G
      Ronnie JonesOklahoma City, OKCentral Junior
      264G
      David JonesOklahoma City, OK
      35
      Randy SkiverEverett, WAWestern Expert
      5Q
      John WincewiczJunction City, ORWestern Junior
      175Y
      Jeff HaneySeaside, CAWestern Novice
      Misc Notes
    • Camel cigarettes sponsors the Grand National Championship as the Camel Pro Series.

    • Yamaha Motors U.S. ceases its factory dirt track effort after the 1977 season, instead using their 1978 budget to fund Kenny Roberts' Grand Prix effort.

    • 23mm intake restrictors are required on 750cc GP machines run at Grand National Road Race events.

    • Evel Knievel sponsors Gary Scott (#5) through the Louisville half mile National.

    • BSA scores its last TT National win (Alex Jorgensen in Gardena, CA, on an A65 Hornet).

    • Norton scores its last dirt track National (Alex Jorgensen in Gardena, CA half mile event, on a Commando).

    • Norton-Villiers-Triumph is liquidated in the UK. Triumph engines continue to be built until 1983.

    • The AMA approves the Honda CX500 - a four-stroke sidewinder twin that would evolve into the NS750 - for Class C competition.
      Factory Teams
      1
      Jay Springsteen
      12
      Ted Boody
      62
      Corky Keener

    1979

    • Steve Eklund (San Jose, CA) wins the Grand National Championship - the first privateer since Dick Mann (1963) to do so.
      11


    • Scott Parker claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award by winning two Grand National events.
      40X

    • Harley-Davidson claims its fourth "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Richard Schlachter claims the unofficial AMA Formula One (Grand National road race) title.

    • Steve Eklund completes the career "Hit For The Cycle / Dirt Track Slam" by winning the San Jose, CA mile event.

    • Rick Hocking completes the career "Hit For The Cycle / Dirt Track Slam" by winning the Hinsdale, IL short track event.

    • 1979 Regional Champions
      65D
      Billy LabrieSt. Petersburg, FLEastern Expert
      74A
      Rob CrabbeLevittown, PAEastern Junior
      96D
      Taylor White IVMonkton, MDEastern Novice
      24
      Bubba RushHouston, TXCentral Expert
      67N
      Bubba ShobertLubbock, TXCentral Junior
      274G
      Scott AdamsBethany, OKCentral Novice
      51
      Brad HurstEugene, ORWestern Expert
      11E
      Jeff HaneySeaside, CAWestern Junior
      111Z
      Benji ZakarianModesto, CAWestern Novice
      Misc Notes:
    • Winston cigarettes takes over sponsorship of the Grand National Championship, now known as the Winston Pro Series.

    • Jerry Griffiths (California) and John Kite (Iowa) both independently build Honda CX500 'sidewinder' for dirt track use.

    • Triumph scores its 68th and last dirt track National win (Brad Hurst at Castle Rock, WA TT event, on a T140).

    • On July 23, Cycle News reports that the AMA is considering adding 26mm restrictors to 750cc dirt track engines to make the 500cc singles more competitive.

      Competition Congress notes for the 1979 season::
    • Junior division twin-cylinder engines must use 28mm intake restrictors (had previously been unrestricted).
    • Intake restrictors for Expert twin-cylinder dirt track engines are considered, but rejected by the Competition Committee.
      Factory Teams
      1
      Jay Springsteen
      42
      Steve Morehead
      10
      David Aldana
      (select TT events)
      15
      Garth Brow
      (select TT events)
      17L
      Rick Hocking
      (select TT events)
      59
      Mickey Fay
      (select TT events)
      98
      John Hateley
      (Houston ST only)
      11E
      Jeff Haney

    1980

    • Randy Goss (Hartland, MI) wins his first Grand National Championship, taking the title by a single point over Hank Scott.
      13

    • Bubba Shobert claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      67N

    • Harley-Davidson claims its fifth "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Richard Schlachter claims his second unofficial AMA Formula One (Grand National road race) title.

    • Kenny Roberts wins his 29th Grand National event, taking over the record for most career wins from Bart Markel (28).
    • 2

    • Ricky Graham scores the first Grand National dirt track win on a mile with an average speed over 100mph (14:55.820 = 100.467mph) at Indianapolis, IN event on August 24, 1980.

    • 1980 Regional Champions
      10
      Billy LabrieSt. Petersburg, FLEastern Expert
      7U
      Steve HallMillville, NJEastern Junior
      77A
      Randy SpenceNortheast, MDEastern Novice
      67N
      Bubba ShobertLubbock, TXCentral Expert
      44G
      Scott AdamsBethany, OKCentral Junior
      225N
      Billy Herndon-Central Novice
      51
      Brad HurstEugene, ORWestern Expert
      16Z
      Rich ArnaizLodi, CAWestern Junior
      161Z
      Billy ScottManteca, CAWestern Novice
      Misc Notes
    • Winston cigarettes sponsors the Grand National Championship as the Winston Pro Series.

    • Harley-Davidson XR750 motorcycles are sold with a 2.75" wide rear rim.

    • Four AMA Pro events in Ohio feature a 500cc class for Novices and Juniors as a test for the 1981 Battle Of The Brands class. The four events are Springfield, Marion, Kenton, and Plain City. The Cycle News articles for two events list "Battle Of The Brands" in the article, but the results state "500cc".

    • Junior Equipment rule change:
    • Junior division twin-cylinder engines must use 27mm intake restrictors (had been 28mm since 1979).
      Factory Teams
      9
      Jay Springsteen
      13
      Randy Goss
      59
      Mickey Fay
      (ST & TT only)
      7L
      Freddie Spencer
      (Houston ST & TT only)
      11E
      Jeff Haney
      2
      Kenny Roberts
      (Houston ST & TT only)
      17
      Rick Hocking
      (Houston ST & TT only)
      17Z
      Jimmy Filice
      (Houston ST & TT only)

    1981

    Back To Top
    • Mike Kidd (Euless, TX) wins the Grand National Championship. Kidd was sponsored by Yamaha, but rode Harley-Davidsons on the miles and half miles.
      72


    • Jimmy Filice claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award, winning one Grand National.
      17Z

    • Harley-Davidson claims its sixth "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Dale Singleton claims the unofficial AMA Formula One (Grand National road race) title.

    • Alex Jorgensen completes the career "Hit For The Cycle / Dirt Track Slam" by winning the Hinsdale, IL short track event.

    • 1981 Regional Champions
      96
      Bill SchaefferPine Grove, PAEastern Expert
      2D
      Mike HilleyBrandon, FLEastern Junior
      99B
      Matt RozowiczBallston Lake, NYEastern Novice
      12
      Ted BoodyLansing, MICentral Expert
      3X
      Johnny CooperGrand Blanc, MICentral Junior
      99H
      Dan IngramClermont, INCentral Novice
      24Q
      Jeff CampbellGrants Pass, ORWestern Expert
      75W
      Kirk StrongEdmonds, WAWestern Junior
      160Q
      Barry PelkeyGrants Pass, ORWestern Novice
      Championship Notes
    • Mike Kidd and Gary Scott entered the season finale at the Ascot HM tied in points. In the final, Kidd finished second while Scott finished fourth. Final points: Kidd (200), Scott (195), Randy Goss (186).

    • Misc Notes
    • Winston cigarettes sponsors the Grand National Championship as the Winston Pro Series.

    • Can-Am wins its first dirt track National (Alex Jorgensen at Hinsdale, IL short track event, on an MX3).

    • The AMA approves the Honda NS750 for Class C competition.

    • Jeff Haney races a factory Honda NS750 at the Ascot Half Mile National on May 9, marking the bike's first appearance in Grand National competition. He qualifies third, but does not make the National.

    • Yamaha hires Roberts/Lawwill (i.e. Kenny Roberts & Mert Lawwill) to field a satellite factory Grand National dirt track and road race team.

    • The Yamaha XS650/GXS-1/OW72 scores its 23rd and final AMA dirt track win (Scott Pearson at Peoria, IL, TT event)

    • The AMA approves the Yamaha XV750E-based dirt tracker, incorrectly known as a "Virago", for Class C competition.


    • Competition Congress Notes for the 1981 season:
    • AMA introduces the "Battle Of The Brands", an additional competition class at AMA pro racing events for Novice and Junior competitors on 500cc single-cylinder engines.
    • AMA considers adding intake restrictors to the Grand National twins for 1982, but decides against it.

      Factory Teams
      1
      Randy Goss
      9
      Jay Springsteen
      19
      Freddie Spencer
      28
      Jeff Haney
      16
      Ronnie Jones
      (ST & TT only)

      Roberts/Lawwill
      72
      Mike Kidd

      Roberts/Lawwill
      17Z
      Jimmy Filice

    1982

    • Ricky Graham (Seaside, CA) wins his first Grand National Championship.
      41

    • Former MX racer Steve Wise claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award, scoring three GNC podiums (two RR and third at the Houston TT) along the way.
      8N

    • Harley-Davidson claims its seventh "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Mike Baldwin claims his second unofficial AMA Formula One (Grand National road race) title.

    • Jay Springsteen win his 30th Grand National event, taking the record for most career wins from Kenny Roberts (29).
      9

    • Scott Pearson scores the first - and only - Grand National win for the Honda NS750 at the Louisville, KY half mile.
      95

    • Hank Scott finishes third at the San Jose mile on the Honda NS750, the motorcycle's best-ever finish on a mile track.
      14

    • Tammy Kirk becomes the second woman in history to hold an AMA Expert dirt track license.
      5C

    • 1982 Regional Champions
      42
      Steve MoreheadFindlay, OHEastern Expert
      96A
      Eric RauschMiddletown, DEEastern Junior
      142S
      Mark HartleyNewport News, VAEastern Novice
      67
      Bubba ShobertLubbock, TXCentral Expert
      10N
      Sammy SweetPorter, TXCentral Junior
      222G
      Kris ArmentroutWichita, KSCentral Novice
      85
      Frank Word IIIGrants Pass, ORWestern Expert
      65W
      Randy GreenLake Stevens, WAWestern Junior
      85Q
      Dan BennettHillsboro, ORWestern Novice
      Misc Notes:
    • Winston cigarettes sponsors the Grand National Championship as the Winston Pro Series. Front number plates may include "Winston Pro Series" in red lettering surrounded by red piping, across the bottom of the plate.

    • The Rotax four-stroke single cylinder engine which will eventually record 52 Grand National wins under various names (ATK, Can-Am, Rotax, Wood-Rotax, and Harley-Davidson) scores its first Grand National win (Alex Jorgensen at Gardena, CA TT event).

    • Yamaha brings its factory team in-house for the 1982 season, to develop the XV750E.
      Factory Teams
      6
      Randy Goss
      9
      Jay Springsteen
      11
      Scott Parker
      1
      Mike Kidd
      (injured in July)
      59
      Mickey Fay
      (ST & TT only)
      95
      Scott Pearson
      11N
      Billy Herndon
      14
      Hank Scott
      (August addition)
      (HM & M only)
      21
      Eddie Lawson
      (ST, TT &
      RR only)
      60
      Wayne Rainey
      (ST, TT &
      RR only)
      17
      Jimmy Filice

    1983

    • Randy Goss (Hartland, MI) wins his second Grand National Championship.
      6

    • Doug Chandler claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award, winning one Grand National.
      8Y

    • Harley-Davidson claims its eighth "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Mike Baldwin claims his third unofficial AMA Formula One (Grand National road race) title.

    • A record 35 events comprise the Grand National Championship calendar

    • Hank Scott scores the first Grand National win for the new Honda RS750 at the DuQuoin, IL mile.

    • Tammy Kirk becomes the first woman to score AMA Grand National points, finishing 14th at the Knoxville, TN half mile event (6/25/1983).
      5C

    • 1983 Regional Champions
      96A
      Eric RauschMiddletown, DEEastern Expert
      42S
      Mark HartleyNewport News, VAEastern Junior
      72D
      David MillerSt. Petersburg, FLEastern Novice
      43
      Mike GilkeyPlano, ILCentral Expert
      2G
      Kris ArmentroutWichita, KSCentral Junior
      176N
      Duane DuVallDallas, TXCentral Novice
      51
      Brad HurstSpringfield, ORWestern Expert
      85Q
      Dan BennettHillsboro, ORWestern Junior
      91Y
      Chris CarrManteca, CAWestern Novice
      Misc Notes:
    • Camel cigarettes takes over sponsorship of the Grand National Championship (had been Winston cigarettes since 1979). Front number plates may include "Camel Pro" centered at the top of the plate.

    • Yamaha Motors U.S. ceases its factory dirt track effort following the 1982 season.

    • Can-Am scores its final National win (Alex Jorgensen at San Jose, CA short track event, on an MX3).

    • The AMA approves the Honda RS750, a 750cc V-twin dirt tracker, for Class C competition. The bike makes its debut at the Ascot HM on May 7, 1983.


    • Competition Congress Notes for the 1983 season:
    • Junior riders must spend a full 12 months in the Junior division before advancing to Expert, regardless of points accumulated. (Cycle News East 5/11 article on Springfield HM).
      Factory Teams
      6
      Randy Goss
      9
      Jay Springsteen
      11
      Scott Parker
      7
      Mike Kidd
      13
      Mickey Fay
      (ST & TT only)
      18
      Terry Poovey
      14
      Hank Scott
      (May addition)
      (HM & M only)
      2
      Kenny Roberts
      (Houston ST
      & TT only)
      21
      Eddie Lawson
      (Houston ST
      & TT only)

    1984

    • Ricky Graham (Seaside, CA) wins his second Grand National Championship, and the first for Honda, by a single point over Bubba Shobert.
      3

    • Dan Bennett claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      Q85

    • Honda claims its first "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Mike Baldwin claims his fourth unofficial AMA Formula One (Grand National road race) title.

    • Chris Carr claims the AMA Junior National Championship.
      Y4

    • Randy Goss completes the career "Hit For The Cycle / Dirt Track Slam" by winning the St. Louis, MO short track event.

    • Ricky Graham sets a new world record on a one-lap dirt track of 34.548 sec (104.203 mph) in qualifying at Springfield, Illinois on May 27, 1984.

    • Tammy Kirk becomes the first woman to ever wear an AMA National Number.
      57

    • 1984 Regional Champions
      42
      Steve MoreheadFindlay, OHEastern Expert
      99F
      Don EstepOrient, OHEastern Junior
      88S
      Rusty RogersRichmond, VAEastern Novice
      80
      Rich KingWaterloo, IACentral Expert
      83K
      Monte HillBloomfield, IACentral Junior
      114K
      Jeff FranzenburgVan Home, IACentral Novice
      13
      Mickey FayAuburn, WAWestern Expert
      3W
      Chris FitzhughEdmonds, WAWestern Junior
      88Q
      Jack BoothHood River, ORWestern Novice
      Championship Notes:
    • Defending AMA Grand National Champion Randy Goss's season ended prematurely at the San Jose Mile (round 28 of 33). Goss was second in points behind Ricky Graham (238-223) entering the race, and was running fourth in the final when he crashed into the fallen Doug Chandler, who had collided with Hank Scott. Goss broke his leg in the crash.

    • Bubba Shobert missed several rounds after punching Terry Poovey after practice at the Saint Louis, MO short track (round 14 of 33). Poovey went to the hospital for seventeen stitches below his eye, while Shobert finished ninth in the final. Shobert was suspended for nine races, but he appealed, and raced at the next two events at Hagerstown and Springfield, finishing 1st and 7th, awaiting his appeal to be heard. The three-member appeal board lowered the suspension from nine races to six races, to include Hagerstown HM, Springfield M, Laguna Seca RR, DuQuoin M, Santa Fe TT, and Pocono RR. Shobert was sixth in points after the St. Louis event with 89 points, while Graham led Goss 121-112. When he returned at Cicero, IL M, Shobert's 89 points was still seventh in points, while Goss led Graham 185-161. So in the final 13 rounds, Shobert made up 71 of the 72 point deficit he had to Graham.

    • Misc Notes:
    • Camel cigarettes sponsors the Grand National Championship (continuing the sponsorship since 1983). Front number plates may include "Camel Pro" centered at the top of the plate.

    • Stroh's beer sponsors the televising of several Grand National mile races as the Stroh's Mile Series.

    • All Grand National Championship events include a Junior National Championship division for Junior division riders.

    • Goodyear stops producing DTII dirt track tires after the 1984 season.

    • AMA approves the Wood-Rotax Newport 560, a 560cc four-stroke single

    • Ted Boody races the first-ever privateer Honda RS750 at the 9/16/1984 San Joe Mile. He finished 9th on the College Bike Shop ride. He would claim the first-ever privateer win for the RS750 at the season finale Springfield mile on October 28.


    • Competition Congress Notes for the 1984 season:
    • Novice division changed to allow 500cc four-stroke single cylinder engines at all dirt track events (previously had been 250cc two-stroke single cylinder equipment since 1977).
    • Junior & Expert short track equipment allowed up to 500cc four-stroke single cylinder engines, or 250cc two-stroke single cylinder engines. (Previously had been 250cc two-stroke single cylinder equipment since 1977).
    • With the move to 500cc, the AMA eliminates the "Battle Of The Brands" division.
    • AMA relocates the district letter from the lower right-hand corner to the lower left-hand corner of the number plate.
      A11
      N55
      Z199
      Factory Teams
      1
      Randy Goss
      9
      Jay Springsteen
      11
      Scott Parker
      3
      Ricky Graham
      10
      Doug Chandler
      67
      Bubba Shobert

    1985

    • Bubba Shobert (Lubbock, TX) wins the Grand National Championship.
      67

    • Chris Carr claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      4Y

    • Honda claims its second "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Brian Atherton claims the AMA Junior National Championship.
      98X

    • Mike Baldwin claims his fifth unofficial AMA Formula One (Grand National road race) title.

    • Jay Springsteen wins his unprecedented 40th Grand National event

    • Scott Parker completes the career "Hit For The Cycle / Dirt Track Slam" by winning the Houston, TX TT event.

    • Harley-Davidson temporarily disbands its in-house race team as a corporate cost-saving measure. The factory riders keep their equipment and salary, but the bikes are no longer maintained in-house. The riders are encouraged to hire their own tuners.

    • Scott Parker hires Bill Werner as an outside contractor to build & tune his Grand National equipment. Their first race together as a team is Louisville, 1985.

    • 1985 Regional Champions
      42
      Steve MoreheadFindlay, OHEastern Expert
      11B
      Les WashbonLockport, NYEastern Junior
      86A
      Eric SassamanSchwenksville, PAEastern Novice
      53
      Tim MertensBelleville, ILCentral Expert
      98X
      Brian AthertonWhite Pigeon, MICentral Junior
      91X
      Jack Mayer, Jr.Midland, MICentral Novice
      4Y
      Chris CarrManteca, CAWestern Expert
      43Q
      Robert HorbanGrants Pass, ORWestern Junior
      143Z
      PJ SanchezSalinas, CAWestern Novice
      Misc Notes:
    • Camel cigarettes sponsors the Grand National Championship (continuing the sponsorship since 1983). Front number plates may include "Camel Pro" centered at the top of the plate.

    • Stroh's beer sponsors the televising of several Grand National mile races as the Stroh's Mile Series.

    • Peter Starr produces the live television broadcast of the AMA Grand National Mile in DuQuoin on ABC's Wide World of Sports.

    • Brainerd, MN hosts the last-ever AMA road race Grand National on September 1.

    • AMA approves the Honda RS660D, a 660cc four-stroke single

    • AMA approves the Wood-Rotax Newport 660, a 660cc four-stroke single


    • Competition Congress Notes for the 1985 season:
    • AMA introduces the Pro-Am sanction, which enables amateur, Novice, and Junior riders to accumulate advancement points towards Junior and Expert while competing at amateur events.
    • The Daytona 200 features the Superbike class for the first time.
    • AMA changes the number plate layout to return the district letter to the lower right hand corner (where it had been from 1933 until 1983).
    • The Novice division changes to red number plates with white numbers and district letters (had used white number plates with red numbers and district letter since 1971).
      99Z
      Factory Teams
      9
      Jay Springsteen
      11
      Scott Parker
      1
      Ricky Graham
      67
      Bubba Shobert

    1986

    • Bubba Shobert (Carmel Valley, CA) wins his second consecutive Grand National Championship.
      1

    • Aaron Hill claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      23Y

    • Honda claims its third "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Bryan McDowell claims the AMA Junior National Championship.
      20Y

    • Randy Renfrow claims the final AMA Formula One road race title, which is no longer part of the AMA Grand National Championship.

    • Bubba Shobert completes the career "Grand Slam" by winning the Phoenix, AZ half mile event.

    • Doug Chandler completes the career "Hit For The Cycle / Dirt Track Slam" by winning the Gardena, CA half mile event.

    • Bubba Shobert sets a new record for Grand National wins in a season with 9 (besting Joe Leonard's 1954 record of 8)

    • Ricky Graham sets a new 25-lap mile National record of 14:33.271 (103.061 mph) at Springfield, Illinois August 31, 1986.

    • Chris Carr sets an unofficial one-lap mile dirt track record with a 33.949 sec (106.041 mph) lap in practice at Springfield, Illinois on August 31, 1986.
      Misc Notes:
    • Camel cigarettes sponsors the Grand National Championship (continuing the sponsorship since 1983). Front number plates may include "Camel Pro" centered at the top of the plate.

    • Scott Parker elects to ride the XR750 at the Peoria TT - "a move that proved very popular with the pro-Harley crowd" [Cycle News East]. Parker finished third in the fourth heat (behind Ricky Graham and Jon Cornwell), and was running sixth in the final when he crashed in turn 3 on lap 4. He made the single-file restart, and finished 11th.

    • Editorial Comment on Parker's XR Ride At Peoria 1986:
    • Parker finished third at Peoria on the XR in 1984. In 1985, he practiced the XR, but ultimately rode the Rotax. In 1986, he rode the XR. Possible reason was that in 1986, single-cylinder engines were limited to 600cc for the first time. In 1985, they could displace up to 750cc, and both Honda and Wood-Rotax had 660cc engines approved for competition. My guess, then, is that Parker felt that the XR was no match for the 660cc singles in 1985, but he felt he had a shot against the 600cc singles in 1986. In the TV broadcast of the event, Dave Despain comments (during the red flag), that Parker "prefers the torque" of the XR. Parker's long-time tuner, Bill Werner, has mentioned (to me, and others) that both Parker and Springsteen "hated" the Rotax singles.


    • Competition Congress Notes for the 1986 season::
    • Grand National Championship loses a "leg" as Road Racing splits off into its own National Championship following the 1985 season. The Grand National Championship continues to feature short track, TT, half mile, and mile events.
    • Effective January 1, 1986, the AMA will not approve for dirt track competition any newly-submitted engines with displacement exceeding 600cc. (Referee Bulletin #86-5A dated February 7,1986)
    • Effective April 1, 1986, any approved single-cylinder engine above 600cc must use a 38mm or smaller carburetor. However, also effective April 1, 1986, any currently approved single-cylinder engine may be converted to 600cc by altering the bore - but not the stroke - of the approved version. The originally approved crankcase, cylinder, and cylinder heads may be altered, but not replaced. (Referee Bulletin #86-5A dated February 7,1986)
    • Junior division twin-cylinder engine restrictors are increased to 28.5mm diameter (had been 27mm since 1980).
    • The Novice division is eliminated after the 1985 season, and replaced by the Pro-Am division, which allows riders to maintain amateur standing in their home districts. Pro-Am division uses red number plates with white numbers, but instead of the traditional district letter, riders use the first letter of their last name in the lower right-hand corner of the number plate.

    • Other Motorcycle Racing Series Notes:
    • AMA Pro Motocross introduces a "production rule", to eliminate the expensive one-off trick bikes made of un-obtanium, in favor of bikes that use the same major components as the production models.

    • Editorial Comment on the Pro-Am numbering system:
    • This was a debacle. Almost immediately, conflicts revealed themselves as two (or more) riders in a region requested with the same number. One had to be assigned a new number, which inevitably conflicted with another rider.
    • It was also confusing for long-time dirt track fans, who were used to letters indicating a specific state.
    • It allowed riders to compete with a "0" as the first digit on their number plates, and also allowed letters like "I" and "O" to be used.
      Factory Teams
      9
      Jay Springsteen
      11
      Scott Parker
      20
      Chris Carr
      1
      Bubba Shobert

    1987

    • Bubba Shobert (Carmel Valley, CA) wins his third consecutive Grand National Championship.
      1

    • Bran Villella claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      65X

    • Honda claims its fourth "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Brian Villella claims the AMA Junior National Championship.
      65X
      Misc Notes:
    • Camel cigarettes sponsors the Grand National Championship (continuing the sponsorship since 1983). Front number plates may include "Camel Pro" centered at the top of the plate.

    • Camel awards the "Camel Pro Championship" to the rider who scores the most combined points in the now-separated dirt track and road race championships.

    • The AMA Grand National Half Mile from Ascot Park is televised live on ABC's Wide World Of Sports.

    • Competition Congress Notes for 1987 season:
    • AMA memo dated April 1, 1987 states that all Expert division twin-cylinder engines at all Pro Racing events must use 33mm restrictors (previously unrestricted). The official explanation cites the move as a 'cost saving' measure due to concerns about engine failures. But tire wear was a significant issue at the time as well.
    • Junior division twin-cylinder engines must use 29mm restrictors (up from 28.5mm since 1986).
    • Effective January 1, 1987, no single-cylinder engine exceeding 600cc in displacement may be used in any AMA profession dirt track racing. Any currently approved single-cylinder engine may be converted to 600cc by altering the bore - but not the stroke - of the approved version. The originally approved crankcase, cylinder, and cylinder heads may be altered, but not replaced.(Referee Bulletin #86-5A dated February 7,1986)
    • (Note: Junior & Expert short track engines had been at a 500cc limit since 1984; half-mile and mile engines had been 750cc since 1969, and TT engines had been 750cc since 1973).
    • Junior and Expert dirt trackers will complete exclusively on four-stroke equipment beginning in 1987. There will be two classes: 0-600cc singles and 0-750cc twins. (AMA Pro Report, February 1986)
    • Pro-Am division single-cylinder four-stroke engines remain at 500cc limit on all courses, despite the Junior & Expert equipment jumping to 600cc.
    • Pro-Am division begins using white number plates with red numbers and the first letter of the rider's last name (had used red plates with white numbers since 1985).
      99B


    • Other Motorcycle Racing Series Notes:
    • AMA Pro Road Racing (now a separate series from the Grand Nationals) ceases to run the Formula 1 class after the 1986 season, focusing instead on Superbikes.
      Factory Teams
      9
      Jay Springsteen
      11
      Scott Parker
      20
      Chris Carr
      1
      Bubba Shobert

    1988

    • Scott Parker (Swartz Creek, MI) wins his first Grand National Championship.
      11

    • Bubba Shobert claims the Camel Pro Series championship by scoring the most combined points in the separate Grand National and AMA Superbike series.
      1

    • Kevin Atherton claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      67X

    • Harley-Davidson claims its ninth "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Kevin Atherton claims the AMA Junior National Championship.
      67X

    • Chris Carr (Harley-Davidson) claims the inaugural AMA 600cc National Championship.
      20

    • Tricia Lyons (Oregon Cirt, OR) becomes the third woman in history to hold an AMA Expert dirt track license.
      17Q
      Misc Notes:
    • Camel cigarettes sponsors the Grand National Championship (continuing the sponsorship since 1983). Front number plates may include "Camel Pro" centered at the top of the plate.

    • Royal Sherbet creates the AMRA PROS series (American Motorcycle Racing Association of Professional Riders Owners & Sponsors) as an anti-AMA pro series. The main difference from AMA Pro was they had a "hard tire" rule that attempted to eliminate the narrow blue grooves that were common at the time. The series only lasted one year.


    • Competition Congress Notes for the 1988 season::
    • Harley-Davidson XR750s must weigh 300#; Honda RS750s must weigh 320#. (Previously no weight limits existed).
    • AMA introduces the 600cc National Series for Junior & Expert competitors on 600cc four-stroke single-cylinder engines.

    • AMA introduces the 600cc National Series for Junior & Expert competitors on 600cc four-stroke single-cylinder engines.
    • Pro-Am equipment changed to 600cc four-stroke single-cylinder engines on all dirt tracks (previously was 500cc four-stroke single-cylinder engines; Junior/Expert single-cylinder equipment had been 600cc since 1987).

    • Factory Teams
      9
      Jay Springsteen
      11
      Scott Parker
      20
      Chris Carr
      1
      Bubba Shobert

    1989

    • Scott Parker (Swartz Creek, MI) wins his second consecutive Grand National Championship.
      1

    • Scott Stump claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      77A

    • Harley-Davidson claims its tenth "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Mike Hale claims the AMA Junior National Championship.
      12N

    • Chris Carr (Harley-Davidson) claims his second AMA 600cc National Championship.
      1
      Misc Notes:
    • Camel cigarettes sponsors the Grand National Championship (continuing the sponsorship since 1983). Front number plates may include "Camel Pro" centered at the top of the plate.

    • American Honda ceases its factory dirt track effort after the 1988 season, instead using its 1989 budget to finance Bubba Shobert's Grand Prix effort.

    • Harley-Davidson updates the XR750, including, but not limited to, the cylinder heads, ignition, crankcases, oil pump, and cam cover.

    • Expert equipment rule change:
    • Grand National Championship half mile and mile events are limited to 750cc twin-cylinder four-stroke engines. The rule is a direct reaction to the growing competitiveness of the Rotax 600cc single cylinder engines, especially at half mile events. Rookie Expert Kevin Atherton finished sixth at the Ascot HM, beating (among others) AMA Grand National Champion Bubba Shobert. Interestingly, AMA Pro events below the Grand National level continue to run 600cc singles and 750cc twins together.
      Factory Teams
      1
      Scott Parker
      9
      Jay Springsteen
      20
      Chris Carr
      23
      Kevin Atherton

    1990

    • Scott Parker (Swartz Creek, MI) wins his third consecutive Grand National Championship.
      1

    • Mike Hale claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      12N

    • Harley-Davidson claims its eleventh "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Brian Tillson claims the AMA Junior National Championship.
      14U

    • Chris Carr (Harley-Davidson) claims his third AMA 600cc National Championship.
      1

    • Tammy Kirk retires as the most successful woman in Grand National history after the 1989 season. Tammy raced in 13 AMA Grand National finals from 1983-1989, with a career best finish of sixth at the 1986 DuQuoin Mile. Her image is tarnished, however, when she refuses to submit her motorcycle to inspection after a protest following the Springfield Mile.
      Misc Notes:
    • Camel cigarettes sponsors the Grand National Championship (continuing the sponsorship since 1983). Front number plates may include "Camel Pro" centered at the top of the plate.

    • Expert equipment rule change:
    • Harley-Davidson XR750 and Honda RS750 must each weigh 315#. (XR750 had been 300# limit while RS750 has been 320# limit since 1988).
      Factory Teams
      1
      Scott Parker
      20
      Chris Carr
      23
      Kevin Atherton

    1991

    Back To Top
    • Scott Parker (Swartz Creek, MI) wins his fourth consecutive Grand National Championship, tying Carroll Reswebers's record (1958-1961).
      1

    • Ian Segedy claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      87

    • Harley-Davidson claims its twelfth "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Wink Frietas claims the AMA Junior National Championship.
      15Y

    • Chris Carr (Harley-Davidson) claims his fourth AMA 600cc National Championship.
      1

    • Scott Parker wins his 41st Grand National event, taking the career win lead away from Jay Springsteen.
      Misc Notes:
    • Camel cigarettes sponsors the Grand National Championship (continuing the sponsorship since 1983). Front number plates may include "Camel Pro" centered at the top of the plate.

    • The AMA approves the Wood-Rotax "605" - a DOHC 600cc single with dual carbs and a water-cooled head - for Class C competition.

    • Factory Teams
      1
      Scott Parker
      20
      Chris Carr
      23
      Kevin Atherton

    1992

    • Chris Carr (Valley Springs, CA) wins his first Grand National Championship.
      20

    • Dale Jenneman claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      29K

    • Harley-Davidson claims its thirteenth "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • James Hart claims the final AMA Junior National Championship.
      16P

    • Chris Carr (Harley-Davidson) claims his fifth AMA 600cc National Championship.
      1

    • Scott Parker wins his unprecedented 50th career Grand National event.

    • Chris Carr completes the career "Hit For The Cycle / Dirt Track Slam" by winning the Daytona Beach, FL short track event.

    • Scott Parker sets a new one-lap mile record of 34.264 sec (105.067 mph) in qualifying at Springfield, Illinois on May 24, 1992. This was the last fastest-ever solo qualifying lap ever recorded, as the practice of solo qualifying was eliminated after the 1993 season.
      Misc Notes:
    • Camel cigarettes sponsors the Grand National Championship (continuing the sponsorship since 1983). Front number plates may include "Camel Pro" centered at the top of the plate.

    • Expert riders who have not scored Grand National Championship points the previous year are permitted to return to the Junior division.

    • New Pro-Am riders are issued riding numbers with district letters. Existing Pro-Am riders are allowed to continue using the first letter of their last name, if they choose (which had been the rule since 1986).

    • AMA finally enforces the rule whereby only certain 600cc single-cylinder "Rotax" engines which were homologated by the Harley-Davidson Motor Company may be called "Harley-Davidson". Only Harley-Davidson factory riders may continue listing their 600cc singles as "H-D". Others use "Rotax", "ATK", "CCM", or "Wood-Rotax".
      Factory Teams
      1
      Scott Parker
      20
      Chris Carr
      23
      Kevin Atherton

    1993

    • Ricky Graham (Salinas, CA) wins his third Grand National Championship, nine years after winning his second. breaking for former record of eight years between titles set by Dick Mann in 1971.
      3

    • Ben Bostrom claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      6Y

    • Harley-Davidson claims its fourteenth "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Chris Carr (Harley-Davidson) claims his sixth AMA 600cc National Championship.
      1

    • Ricky Graham claims the inaugural AMA 883 Sportster National Championship.
      3

    • Ricky Graham wins six consecutive Grand National events, smashing the record of four originally set by Joe Leonard in 1954, tied by Carroll Resweber in 1961, and tied by Scott Parker in 1989.

    • Ricky Graham sets a new record for Grand National wins in a season with 12 (besting Scott Parker's 1989 record of 10).
      Misc Notes:
    • There is no headline sponsor for the Grand National Championship for the first time since 1974.

    • The Junior division is eliminated after the 1992 season.

    • Expert division is renamed "Grand National Expert", and a "Basic Expert" division is introduced to replace the eliminated Junior division. Basic Experts are not permitted to compete at Grand National Championship half mile or mile events without special permission.

    • Basic Experts use white number plates with black numbers and district letters, just like their Grand National Expert counterparts.

    • Harley-Davidson 883 Sportster division is introduced, using essentially stock 883cc D.O.T.-legal (U.S. Department of Transportation) Sportsters with minimal modifications.
      Factory Teams
      1
      Chris Carr
      2
      Scott Parker

    1994

    • Scott Parker (Swartz Creek, MI) wins an unprecedented fifth Grand National Championship.
      2

    • Kenny Coolbeth claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      32U

    • Harley-Davidson claims its fifteenth "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Mickey Fay (privateer) claims the AMA 600cc National Championship.
      13

    • Scott Stump claims the AMA 883 Sportster National Championship.
      77

    • Scott Parker wins his unprecedented 60th career Grand National event.
      Misc Notes:
    • AMA begins using four-lap 'scratch heats' in place of the one-lap time trials for determining heat race line-ups at Grand National Events. The AMA had used one-lap time trials since, it seemed, forever. The elimination of the one-lap time trials was an attempt to address the growing frequency of "one-lined" race tracks.

    • District letter assignments are reconfigured, in some cases introducing a different letter for Pro-Sport riders than Expert riders from the same district. Previously all pro riders from a district shared the same district letter. Some examples include Wisconsin, Michigan, and Washington, where Pro-Sport riders begin using L, J, and M, respectively, while their Expert counterparts continue using K, X, and W.

    • AMA creates Paradama, a for-profit organization intended to manage the AMA's sports marketing and professional racing.
      Factory Teams
      2
      Scott Parker
      4
      Chris Carr

    1995

    • Scott Parker (Swartz Creek, MI) wins an unprecedented sixth Grand National Championship.
      1

    • Paul Morgan III claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      83P

    • Harley-Davidson claims its sixteenth "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Chris Carr (Harley-Davidson) claims his seventh AMA 600cc National Championship.
      4

    • Mike Hacker claims the AMA 883 Sportster National Championship.
      67

    • Scott Parker wins his unprecedented 70th career Grand National event.

    • Chris Carr sets a new 25-lap mile National record of 14:26.770 (103.834 mph) at Springfield, Illinois on May 25, 1995.
      Factory Teams
      1
      Scott Parker
      4
      Chris Carr
      67
      Mike Hacker
      (ST & TT only)

    1996

    • Scott Parker (Swartz Creek, MI) wins an unprecedented seventh Grand National Championship.
      1

    • JR Schnabel claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      15K

    • Harley-Davidson claims its seventeenth "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Eric Bostrom claims the AMA 883 Sportster National Championship.
      20

    • Brett Landes (privateer) claims the last AMA 600cc National Championship.
      41
      Misc Notes:
    • ATK wins its first dirt track national (Will Davis at Daytona Beach short track event).
      Factory Teams
      1
      Scott Parker
      67
      Mike Hacker
      (ST & TT only)

    1997

    • Scott Parker (Swartz Creek, MI) wins an unprecedented eighth Grand National Championship.
      1

    • Johnny Murphree claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      35Z

    • Harley-Davidson claims its eighteenth "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Davey Camlin claims the AMA 883 Sportster National Championship.
      27

    • Scott Parker wins his unprecedented 80th career Grand National event.
      Misc Notes:
    • Beer Nuts sponsors five Beer Nuts Challenge races, each with a $20,000 purse. Rapid City HM, Springfield M, Sacramento M, Las Vegas HM, and Del Mar M are the events.

    • Grand National point systems changes to 23-19-16-15-14-13-12-11-10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1. (It had been 20-16-13-11-10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 since 1976).

    • 600cc National Series is eliminated after the 1996 season.

    • The AMA Pro Regional Series is eliminated after the 1996 season.

    • AMA introduces the Hot Shoe National Series as a "feeder" series to the Grand National Championship series. This series is intended to replace the 600cc National and AMA Regional series.

    • Pro-Am division is renamed Pro-Sport.
      Factory Teams
      1
      Scott Parker
      4
      Chris Carr
      71
      Georgie Price
      (ST & TT only)
      89
      Kevin Varnes
      (ST & TT only)

    1998

    • Scott Parker (Swartz Creek, MI) wins an unprecedented ninth Grand National Championship and equally unprecedented fifth consecutive Grand National Championship.
      1

    • Bryan Bigelow claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      11

    • Harley-Davidson claims its nineteenth "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Jess Roeder claims the AMA 883 Sportster National Championship.
      94

    • Scott Parker wins his unprecedented 90th career Grand National event.

    • Michelle DiSalvo becomes the fourth woman to hold an AMA Expert dirt track license.
      38Y

    • Brad Andres, Leo Anthony, Sam Arena, Ernie Beckman, Everett Brashear, Mark Brelsford, Eddie Brinck, Ben Campanale, Woodsie Castonguay, Jimmy Chann, Jim Davis, Dave Despain, Dick Dorresteyn, Floyd Dreyer, Chet Dykgraaf, Ted Edwards, Kenny Eggers, Steve Eklund, Floyd Emde, Randy Goss, Ricky Graham, Larry Headrick, Ralph Hepburn, Bobby Hill, Lester Hillbish, Jules Horky, Billy Huber, Hap Jones, Maldwyn Jones, Mike Kidd, Dick Klamfoth, Ed Kretz Sr., Mert Lawwill, Joe Leonard, Fred Ludlow, Dick Mann, Bart Markel, Billy Mathews, Bill Miller, Cordy Milne, Gary Nixon, Joe Petrali, Jimmy Phillips, Roger Reiman, Carroll Resweber, Kenny Roberts, Gene Romero, Gary Scott, Bubba Shobert, Tom Sifton, Johnny Spiegelhoff, Baba Tancrede, Bill Tuman, Eugene Walker, Joe Weatherly, and Earl Widman are inducted into the new AMHF Hall of Fame.

    • Brad Andres, Mark Brelsford, Jimmy Chann, Jim Davis, Chet Dykgraaf, Steve Eklund, Randy Goss, Ricky Graham, Larry Headrick, Bobby Hill, Mike Kidd, Mert Lawwill, Joe Leonard, Dick Mann, Bart Markel, Gary Nixon, Joe Petrali, Roger Reiman, Carroll Resweber, Kenny Roberts, Gene Romero, Gary Scott, Bubba Shobert, and Bill Tuman are inducted into the inaugural class of Dave Despain's Dirt Track Hall of Fame.
      Misc Notes::
    • The Honda RS750 scores its 79th and final Grand National win (Rich King, Joliet, IL half mile event).

    • Dave Despain organizes the inaugural Dirt Track Hall Of Fame race, a $50,000, 15-rider, 10-lap event, at the Springfield Mile on September 5 (during an AMA Hot Shoe event). The qualifying events were sponsored by Beer Nuts.

    • Factory Teams
      1
      Scott Parker
      31
      Kenny Coolbeth
      (ST & TT only)
      43
      Joe Kopp
      (ST & TT only)

    1999

    • Chris Carr (Fleetwood, PA) wins his second Grand National Championship.
      4



    • Nicky Hayden claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      69

    • Harley-Davidson claims its twentieth "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Willie McCoy claims the AMA 883 Sportster National Championship.
      59

    • Joe Kopp claims the inaugural AMA Supertracker National Championship.
      43

    • Michelle DiSalvo becomes the second woman to hold an AMA National Number, based on her success in the AMA 883 Sporster Series.
      97

    • J.C. Agajanian, Giacomo Agostini, David Aldana, Leonard Andres, C.R. Axtell, Steve Baker, Kel Carruthers, Yvon DuHamel, Don Emde, Walt Fulton Jr., Paul Goldsmith, Al Gunter, Eddie Lawson, Ken Maely, Eddie Mulder, Jody Nicholas, Fred Nix, Wayne Rainey, Cal Rayborn, Roxy Rockwood, George Roeder, Freddie Spencer, Sammy Tanner, and Skip Van Leeuwen are inducted into the AMHF Hall of Fame.

    • Everett Brashear, Ben Campanale, Alex Jorgensen, Fred Nix, Jim Rice, and Hank Scott are inducted into Dave Despain's Dirt Track Hall of Fame.
      Misc Notes:
    • Drag Specialties sponsors the Grand National Championship.

    • AMA introduces the Supertracker division for Grand National Experts, open to all U.S.D.O.T.-approved (U.S. Department of Transportation) four-stroke twin-cylinder engines displacing up to 1000cc (water-cooled) or 1250cc (air-cooled pushrod). Supertracker division use black number plates with white numbers and district letters.
      67

    • Harley-Davidson 883 Sportster division begin using yellow number plates with black numbers and district letters.
      59

    • A July 1, 1999 press release announces that the AMA has hired Scott Hollingworth as CEO of AMA Pro Racing.

    • Factory Teams
      1
      Scott Parker
      31
      Kenny Coolbeth
      (ST & TT only)
      43
      Joe Kopp
      (ST & TT only)

    2000

    • Joe Kopp (Mica, WA) wins the Grand National Championship.
      43


    • Jason Tyer claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      12N

    • Harley-Davidson claims its twenty-first "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Willie McCoy claims his second AMA 883 Sportster National Championship.
      1

    • Joe Kopp claims his second AMA Supertracker National Championship.
      43

    • Scott Parker wins his last Grand National event, setting the record for career Grand National wins with 94.

    • Scott Parker sets a new 25-lap mile National record of 14:25.200 (104.022 mph) at Springfield, Illinois on September 3, 2000.

    • Ted Boody, Jimmy Filice, Dick Hammer, Neil Keen, Randy Mamola, Dick O'Brien, Hank Scott, and Bill Werner are inducted into the AMHF Hall of Fame.

    • Floyd Dreyer, Ronnie Jones, Steve Morehead, Scott Parker, and Shell Thuet are inducted into Dave Despain's Dirt Track Hall of Fame.
      Misc Notes:
    • Progressive Insurance sponsors the renamed U.S. Flat Track Championship.

    • ATK wins its last dirt track national (Will Davis at Daytona Beach short track event).

    • Short track events are now defined as courses less than 1,800 feet in length when measured 18" from the pole (previously had been 2,250 feet).

    • AMA re-brands the sport as the U.S. Flat Track Championships. Its official name since 1986 had been the Grand National Dirt Track Series.
      Factory Teams
      2
      Scott Parker
      80
      Rich King
      31
      Kenny Coolbeth
      (ST & TT only)
      43
      Joe Kopp
      (ST & TT only)

    2001

    Back To Top
    • Chris Carr (Fleetwood, PA) wins his third Grand National Championship.
      4


    • Bryan Smith claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      84X

    • Bryan Smith claims the AMA 883 Sportster National Championship.
      84X

    • Bryan Bigelow claims the final AMA Supertracker National Championship.
      11

    • Harley-Davidson claims its twenty-second "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Jennifer Snyder becomes the fifth woman to hold an AMA Expert dirt track license.
      15N

    • Stephanie Welch becomes the sixth woman to hold an AMA Expert dirt track license.
      11X

    • Mike Baldwin, Babe DeMay, George Everett, Ronnie Rall,Jim Rice, Ralph White, and Steve Wise are inducted into the AMHF Hall of Fame. Larry Meiers and Shell Thuett are inducted through the Ambassadors & Industry category.

    • Will Davis, Ken Maely, Walt Mahony, and Jay Springsteen are inducted into Dave Despain's Dirt Track Hall of Fame.
      Misc Notes:
    • Progressive Insurance sponsors the Grand National Championship.

    • Ford Quality Checked sponsors Chris Carr (#4)
      Factory Teams
      80
      Rich King
      15N
      Jennifer Snyder
      (ST & TT only)
      1
      Joe Kopp
      (ST & TT only)
      31
      Kenny Coolbeth
      (ST & TT only)

    2002

    • Chris Carr (Fleetwood, PA) wins his fourth Grand National Championship.
      1


    • Jake Johnson claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award, winning one Grand National.
      14U

    • Jared Mees claims the AMA 883 Sportster National Championship.
      16A

    • Harley-Davidson claims its twenty-third "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Nicky Hayden wins the May 25, 2002 Springfield TT over Tommy Hayden and Roger Hayden. It marks this first time in AMA history that three family members complete the podium at a National event.
    • Shaun Russell finishes 13th at the Springfield TT on a Honda CR250, marking the last-ever Grand National points ever scored by a two-stroke motorcycle.
      28

    • JR Schnabel finishes 14th at the Lima and Harrington half miles on a Buell.
      33

    • Stephanie Welch becomes the third woman to hold an AMA National Number, based on her success in the 883 Sportster Series.
      79

    • Will Davis, Ed Fisher, Ed Kretz Jr., Walt Mahony, and Dale Singleton are inducted into the AMHF Hall of Fame.
      Misc Notes:
    • Progressive Insurance sponsors the U.S. Flat Track Championship.

    • The Supertracker division is eliminated after the 2001 season, with the equipment absorbed into the Grand National series.

    • Ford Quality Checked sponsors Chris Carr (#1)

    • Single cylinder equipment rule change:
    • Single-cylinder equipment in all divisions are limited to 505cc four-stroke overhead valve, 550cc push-rod engines, or 250cc two-strokes. (Had been 600cc since 1987). The odd 505cc displacement is selected based on the displacement achieved by re-sleeving 600cc Rotax engines down to near 500cc. For the first time in history, the AMA permits modifying the stroke of the engine to achieve the 505cc or 550cc limit.

    • Expert equipment rule change:
    • Expert division twin-cylinder equipment expanded to include the previous Supertracker division: up to 1000cc D.O.T.-approved (U.S. Department of Transportation) twin-cylinder four-stroke engines (with water-cooling) or up to 1250cc D.O.T.-approved (U.S. Department of Transportation) twin-cylinder four-stroke engines (air-cooled push-rod engines).
      Factory Teams
      80
      Rich King
      15N
      Jennifer Snyder
      (ST & TT only)
      3
      Joe Kopp
      (ST & TT only)
      31
      Kenny Coolbeth
      (ST & TT only)

    2003

    • Chris Carr (Fleetwood, PA) wins his fifth Grand National Championship.
      1



    • Raun Wood claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      88

    • Scott Scherb claims the AMA 883 Sportster National Championship.
      78

    • Harley-Davidson claims its twenty-fourth "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Scott Parker, Jay Springsteen, and Fred Toscani are inducted into the AMHF Hall of Fame.
      Misc Notes:
    • Progressive Insurance sponsors the U.S. Flat Track Championship.

    • Ford Quality Checked sponsors Chris Carr (#1)

    • In honor of Harley-Davidson's 100th anniversary, Rich King wears National #100.

    • On November 22, 2003, the AMA updates its logo for the third time since 1924, and the first time since 1976.

    • Factory Teams
      100
      Rich King
      15N
      Jennifer Snyder
      (ST & TT only)
      3
      Joe Kopp
      (ST & TT only)
      31
      Kenny Coolbeth
      (ST & TT only)
      16
      AJ Eslick
      89
      Kevin Varnes

      Factory-Supported Privateer Teams

      Memphis Shades
      33
      JR Schnabel
      (ST & TT only)

    2004

    • Chris Carr (Fleetwood, PA) wins his sixth Grand National Championship.
      1



    • Jared Mees claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
      21

    • Chris Hart claims the AMA 883 Sportster National Championship.
      44

    • Harley-Davidson claims its twenty-fifth "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

    • Chris Carr, Wes Cooley, John Gibson, Steve Morehead, and John Tibben are inducted into the AMHF Hall of Fame.

    • Nichole Cheza becomes the seventh woman to hold an AMA Expert dirt track license.
      16X
        Misc Notes:
      • Progressive Insurance sponsors the U.S. Flat Track Championship.

      • Ford Quality Checked sponsors Chris Carr (#1)

      • KTM wins its first dirt track National (Chris Carr at San Francisco, CA short track event).


      • The Rotax four-stroke single cylinder engine which recorded wins under various names (ATK, Can-Am, Rotax, Wood-Rotax, and Harley-Davidson) scores its 52nd and final Grand National win (Chris Carr at Oak Ridge, TN short track event).
      • \
      • AMA tests digitial transponders for qualifying at two indoor short track Nationals.
        Factory Teams
        80
        Rich King
        3
        Joe Kopp
        (ST & TT only)
        31
        Kenny Coolbeth
        (ST & TT only)
        16
        AJ Eslick
        89
        Kevin Varnes

        Factory-Supported Privateer Teams

        Memphis Shades
        33
        JR Schnabel
        (ST & TT only)

      2005

      • Chris Carr (Fleetwood, PA) wins his seventh Grand National Championship and fifth consecutive Grand National Championship, tying Scott Parker's record for consecutive titles set in 1998.
        1


      • Nick Cummings claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
        69X

      • Scott Stump claims his second AMA 883 Sportster National Championship.
        77A

      • Harley-Davidson claims its twenty-sixth "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

      • Chris Carr sets an unofficial one-lap world record during the main event on the Springfield Mile on September 4, 2005, with a single lap of 33.913 seconds (106.154 mph).

      • Chris Carr sets a new 25-lap mile National record of 14:23.451 (104.233 mph) at Springfield, Illinois on September 4, 2005.

      • Ralph Berndt, Jerry Branch, and Tom Cates are inducted into the AMHF Hall of Fame.
        Misc Notes:
      • Ford Quality Checked sponsors the Grand National Championship.

      • Ford Quality Checked sponsors Chris Carr (#1)

      • Bill Werner retires from the Harley-Davidson Motor Company. From 1975-1998, he led three riders - Gary Scott, Jay Springsteen, and Scott Parker - to thirteen Grand National Championships as tuner.
        Factory Teams
        80
        Rich King
        14
        Jake Johnson
        89
        Kevin Varnes

        Factory-Supported Privateer Teams

        Memphis Shades
        33
        JR Schnabel
        (ST & TT only)

      2006

      • Jake Johnson (Franklinville, NJ) claims the Grand National Singles title.
        14

      • Kenny Coolbeth (Warren, CT) takes the official Grand National Twins title.
        31

      • Kenny Coolbeth scores the most combined points in all combined Grand National Championship events, but no title is awarded for this feat.

      • Sammy Halbert claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
        43

      • Honda claims the "Grand National Singles Manufacturer's Championship".

      • Harley-Davidson claims the "Grand National Twins Manufacturer's Championship".

      • Doug Chandler and Roger Soderstrom are inducted into the AMHF Hall of Fame.
        Misc Notes:
      • Ford Quality Checked sponsors the Grand National Championship.

      • Ford Quality Checked sponsors Chris Carr (#1)

      • Harley-Davidson 883 Sportster Division is eliminated after the 2005 season.

      • AMA begins using digital transponders for qualifiying at all Grand National events. (Had used 4-lap scratch heats since 1994).

      • Short track events are now defined as courses less than 1,750 feet in length when measured 18" from the pole (previously had been 1,800 feet).

      • Babe Demay (Memphis Shades team) begins campaigning a Yamaha 750cc twin based on the 1982 Yamaha Vision.

      • Single cylinder equipment rule change:
      • Single-cylinder equipment in all divisions (Pro-Sport all; Basic Expert & Grand National Expert Short Track & TT) limited to 450cc four-stroke engines (had been 505cc since 2002).

      • Twin cylinder equipment rule change:
      • Twin cylinder engines used at Grand National Half Mile events are unrestricted for the first time since 1987 (previously had been restricted to 33mm). Engines continue to use 33mm restrictors at Mile events.

      • Grand National Championship Series Change:
      • The Grand National Championship is split into two separate series: Grand National Championship Singles (for short track and TT events) and Grand National Championship Twins (for half mile and mile events).
        • The rulebook does not officially recognize the rider who scores the most combined points as a Grand National Champion.
        • For the first time, twin-cylinder engines are officially banned from TT races.

        Factory Teams
        31
        Kenny Coolbeth
        (HM & M only)
        14
        Jake Johnson
        89
        Kevin Varnes

        Factory-Supported Privateer Teams

        Memphis Shades
        33
        JR Schnabel
        (ST & TT only)

      2007

      • Kenny Coolbeth (Warren, CT) claims the official Grand National Singles title.
        31

      • Kenny Coolbeth (Warren, CT) takes the official Grand National Twins title.
        1

      • Kenny Coolbeth scores the most combined points in all combined Grand National Championship events, but no title is awarded for this feat.

      • Mike Rush claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award, winning one Grand National event.
        54

      • Suzuki claims the "Grand National Singles Manufacturer's Championship".

      • Matt Weidman claims the inaugural Basic Twins title.
        73B

      • Harley-Davidson claims the "Grand National Twins Manufacturer's Championship".

      • Nichole Cheza becomes the second woman to ever score AMA Grand National points by finishing 18th at the Joliet IL half mile (7/7/2007).
        16X

      • Rex Beauchamp is inducted into the AMHF Hall of Fame from the Dirt Track category.
        Misc Notes:
      • Ford Quality Checked sponsors the Grand National Championship.

      • AMA offers to sell its Pro Racing properties. Daytona Motorsports Group (DMG) makes the winning bid.

      • DMG introduces the Basic Expert Twins division that will compete at Grand National half mile and mile events. Equipment will focus on 650cc twins, with purpose-built race engines (XR750 & RS750) restricted to 29mm diameter. Basic Expert Twins will use black number plates with white numbers and district letters, while Basic Expert Singles will continue to use white number plates with black numbers and district letters.
        73B

      • Jesse Janisch races a Bill Werner-built Kawasaki EX650 at both Springfield Mile Grand National twins races.
        45

      • Dan Gedeon begins racing a Triumph built by Ed Fatzinger at the Grand National twins races.
        12F

      • Doug Stewart's Live 1 Sports streams AMA Grand National Championship events live online for free in 2007-2008.
        Factory Teams
        1
        Kenny Coolbeth
        (HM & M only)
        14
        Jake Johnson
        33
        JR Schnabel

        Factory-Supported Privateer Teams

        Screaming Eagle/
        Latus Motors
        3
        Joe Kopp
        (HM & M only)

        Screaming Eagle/
        Blue Springs
        21
        Jared Mees
        (HM & M only)

        Screaming Eagle/
        Moroney's
        42
        Bryan Smith
        (HM & M only)

        Memphis Shades
        43
        Sammy Halbert
        (ST & TT only)

      2008

      • Jake Johnson (Franklinville, NJ) claims the Grand National Singles title.
        14

      • Kenny Coolbeth (Warren, CT) takes the official Grand National Twins title.
        1

      • Kenny Coolbeth scores the most combined points in all combined Grand National Championship events, but no title is awarded for this feat.

      • Suzuki claims the "Grand National Singles Manufacturer's Championship".

      • Harley-Davidson claims the "Grand National Twins Manufacturer's Championship".

      • Matt Weidman claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
        73B

      • Brandon Robinson claims the Basic Twins title.
        44A

      • Nichole Cheza becomes the fourth woman to ever wear an AMA National Number.
        15

      • Terry Poovey is inducted into the AMHF Hall of Fame from the Dirt Track category.
        Misc Notes:
      • Ford Quality Checked sponsors the Grand National Championship.

      • Kawasaki wins its first dirt track National (Henry Wiles at Peoria, IL TT event), as well as its first short track National (Henry Wiles at Springfield IL ST event).

      • Pro-Sport riders with sufficient single-cylinder experience are permitted to participate in the Basic Expert Twins division at Grand National Championship events

      • AMA announces on March 7 that DMG is the winning bidder for all AMA Pro Racing properites. DMG officially takes over Grand National Series in May.

      • DMG implements a rule whereby National Numbers will no longer be renewed annually. Each rider earning a National Number through earning Grand National points will hold that number for five years. (I performed a statistical analysis and showed that DMG would not run out of numbers with this scheme).

      • The AMA changes its logo for the third time since 1924, and the first since 2003. Troy Lee updates the "star" logo used from 1975-2002.

      • Doug Stewart's Live 1 Sports streams AMA Grand National Championship events live online for free in 2007-2008.

      • Basic Expert Twins rule change:
      • Basic Expert Twins restrictor size lowered to 27mm (was 29mm) for purpose-built race engines (XR750 & RS750).
        Factory Teams
        1
        Kenny Coolbeth
        (HM & M only)
        14
        Jake Johnson
        33
        JR Schnabel

        Factory-Supported Privateer Teams

        Screaming Eagle/
        Latus Motors
        3
        Joe Kopp
        (HM & M only)

        Screaming Eagle/
        Blue Springs
        21
        Jared Mees
        (HM & M only)

        Screaming Eagle/
        Moroney's
        42
        Bryan Smith
        (HM & M only)

      2009

      • Henry Wiles (Blanchard, MI) claims the Grand National Singles title.
        17

      • Jared Mees (Clio, MI) takes the official Grand National Twins title.
        21

      • Sammy Halbert (Graham, WA) scores the most combined points in all combined Grand National Championship events, but no title is awarded for this feat. Halbert, Joe Kopp, and Jared Mees finish in the tightest 3-rider points battle in history (203-202-200).
        43

      • Mick Kirkness (Wachope, AUS) claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award. The Australian is the first-ever non-U.S. citizen to win the award.
        87

      • Kawasaki claims the "Grand National Singles Manufacturer's Championship".

      • Harley-Davidson claims the "Grand National Twins Manufacturer's Championship".

      • Brad Baker (Dryad, WA) claims the inaugural Pro Singles National Championship.
        17M

      • Joe Kopp completes the career "Hit For The Cycle / Dirt Track Slam" by winning the Daytona, FL short track event.

      • Jake Johnson completes the career "Hit For The Cycle / Dirt Track Slam" by winning the Springfield, IL mile event.

      • Chuck Palmgren is inducted into the AMHF Hall of Fame from the Dirt Track category.
        Single cylinder equipment rule change:
      • Single cylinder equipment used at AMA Pro Racing events (Grand National or Hot Shoe) must use OEM frames.

      • Twin cylinder equipment rule change:
      • Expert twin-cylinder engines are unrestricted for production engines 750cc and less; purpose-built racing engines (XR750 and RS750) are restricted to 33mm; other engines larger than 750cc are restricted to 38mm. (Had been unrestricted on half mile events since 2006).

      • Misc Notes:
      • DMG introduces the Pro Singles National Championship, which will run as a support division at all Grand National Events. Pro Singles National Champions can either defend their title wearing the #1 plate, or if they move up to Expert, will be awarded a National Number.

      • The Basic Expert Division is eliminated after the 2008 season. Basic Experts can choose whether to move into the new Pro or Expert divisions.

      • AMA/DMG introduces the "Dash For Cash", which takes the top two finishers in each Grand National heat race into a sprint race, paying 5-4-3-2-1-0 Grand National points.

      • U.S. Suzuki ceases its factory dirt track effort after the 2008 season.

      • Sunoco is named the official fuel of AMA Pro Flat Track.

      • Pro-Sport division is renamed "Pro"

      • Grand National Expert division is renamed "Expert".

      • Pro division (singles only) participate as a support division at all Grand National Championship events.

      • Pro division riders can compete in a Twin-cylinder class at Hot Shoe events

      • Grooving of tires is prohibited.
        Factory Teams
        1
        Kenny Coolbeth
        (HM & M only)

        Factory-Supported Privateer Teams

        Screaming Eagle/
        Latus Motors
        3
        Joe Kopp
        (HM & M only)

        Screaming Eagle/
        Blue Springs
        21
        Jared Mees
        (HM & M only)

        Screaming Eagle/
        Moroney's
        42
        Bryan Smith
        (HM & M only)

        Bill Werner
        Racing
        33
        JR Schnabel

        Bill Werner
        Racing
        73
        Doug Lawrence

      2010

      • Jake Johnson (Coatesville, PA) wins his first overall Grand National Championship.
        5


      • Henry Wiles (Winn, MI) is recognized as the Grand National Singles champion.
        17

      • Jake Johnson (Coatesville, PA) is recognized as the Grand National Twins champion
        5

      • PJ Jacobsen claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
        99B

      • Kawasaki claims the "Grand National Singles Manufacturer's Championship".

      • Harley-Davidson claims the "Grand National Twins Manufacturer's Championship".

      • Jeffrey Carver Jr. (Alton, IL) claims the Pro Singles National Championship.
        24P

      • Don Castro is inducted into the AMHF Hall of Fame from the Dirt Track category.
        Misc Notes::
      • K&N Filters takes over title sponsorship of the Grand National Championship.

      • All Grand National Singles & Twins champions to date (2006-2008) are offered single digits for the 2010 season. Not all accept them. Kenny Coolbeth takes #2; Jake Johnson takes #5; Jared Mees takes #9. Henry Wiles retains #17. Sammy Halbert, who scored the most combined Grand National points in 2009 but is not officially recognized as a Grand National Champion, takes #7.

      • Ducati scores its first-ever Grand National win (Joe Kopp in Prescott, AZ, mile event)

      • The AMA Hot Shoe 'National' series is eliminated after the 2009 season, replaced by the new 'All-Star Series' events, which offer a mix of Pro and Amateur divisions to act as a feeder series to the Grand Nationals.

      • Sunoco returns as the official fuel of AMA Pro Flat Track.

      • All rear tires at all Nationals to be Dunlop/Goodyear CD-8 compound.

      • The top 10 from the 2009 Pro Singles National Championship are granted provisional licenses to compete in the Grand National division at three events - Lake Odessa, MI, Castiloga, CA, and Prescott Valley, AZ. Defending Pro Singles Champ Brad Baker makes the Grand National Main Event at Lake Odessa.

      • On February 4, 2010, AMA Pro Racing announces a three-year agreement with MAV-TV to broadcast select rounds of the AMA Grand National Championship.

      • Twin-cylinder equipment rule change:
      • Harley-Davidson XR750 and Honda RS750 engines to be restricted to 32mm on all tracks. All other twin-cylinder engines above 750cc to be restricted to 38mm.

      • Single cylinder equipment rule change:
      • Single-cylinder engines must maintain the original valve size and valve angle as on the OEM product.
        Factory Teams
        2
        Kenny Coolbeth
        (HM & M only)
        42
        Bryan Smith

      2011

      Back To Top
      • Jake Johnson (Coatesville, PA) wins his second consecutive Grand National Championship.
        1


      • Sammy Halbert (Graham, WA) is recognized as the Grand National Singles champion.
        7

      • Jared Mees (Clio, MI) is recognized as the Grand National Twins champion.
        9

      • Brad Baker (Dryad, WA) claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
        12

      • Kawasaki claims the "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

      • Mikey Martin (Acampo, CA) claims the Pro Singles National Championship.
        91Y

      • Shayna Texter (Willow Street, PA) wins the Pro Singles final at Knoxville, IA half mile. It marks the first-ever victory by a woman in AMA National Championship dirt track competition.
        25A

      • Sunoco returns as the official fuel of AMA Pro Flat Track.
        Misc Notes:
      • Harley-Davidson Insurance sponsors the Grand National Championship.

      • Motorcycle Superstore sponsors the Pro Singles National Championship.

      • Following the 2010 season, DMG re-establishes a single Grand National Champion to wear the #1 plate at all events in 2011. The individual Grand National Singles and Grand National Twins champions will be recognized, but they will not wear #1 the following year.

      • AMA begins awarding 1 Grand National point to the rider who leads the most laps at each National.

      • Rear tires at the Daytona short track Nationals are allowed to be Dunlop/Goodyear CD-5 compound

      • Grooving of rear tires is re-permitted

      • The top 10 from the 2010 Pro Singles National Championship are granted provisional licenses to compete in the Grand National division at four events - Sacramento, CA, Knoxville, IA, Shakopee, MN, and Castiloga, CA.
        Factory Teams
        2
        Kenny Coolbeth
        (HM & M only)

      2012

      • Jared Mees (Clio, MI) wins his first overall Grand National Championship.
        9


      • Jared Mees (Clio, MI) is recognized as the Grand National Singles champion.
        9

      • Bryan Smith (Flushing, MI) is recognized as the Grand National Twins champion.
        42

      • Briar Bauman (Salinas, CA) claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
        10Z

      • Kawasaki claims the "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

      • Stephen Vanderkuur (Davison, MI) claims the Pro Singles National Championship.
        10J

      • Sammy Halbert completes the career "Hit For The Cycle / Dirt Track Slam" by winning the Indianapolis, IN mile event.

      • Shayna Texter wins three Pro Singles finals (Sacramento, CA mile, Knoxville, IA half mile, Tuscon, AZ half mile).
        25A

      • Al Wilcox is inducted into the AMHF Hall of Fame from the Dirt Track category.
        Misc Notes:
      • Harley-Davidson Insurance sponsors the Grand National Championship.

      • Motorcycle Superstore sponsors the Pro Singles National Championship.

      • The top 20 from the 2011 Pro Singles National Championship are granted provisional licenses to compete at all Grand National twins events in 2012.

      • Sunoco returns as the official fuel of AMA Pro Flat Track.
        Factory Teams
        2
        Kenny Coolbeth
        (HM & M only)
        12
        Brad Baker
        (part-time fill-in
        for injured
        Coolbeth)

        (HM & M only)

        Bonneville
        Performance
        91
        Mikey Martin
        (HM & M only)

        Factory-Supported Privateer Teams

        Waters
        Auto Body
        51
        Steve Murray
        (HM & M only)

      2013

      • Brad Baker (Dryad, WA) wins his first Grand National Championship. At 20 years, 7 months, and 23 days of age, Brad is the youngest Grand National Champion since Jay Springsteen in 1977.
        12



      • Brad Baker (Dryad, WA) is recognized as the Grand National Singles champion.
        12

      • Bryan Smith (Flushing, MI) is recognized as the Grand National Twins champion.
        42

      • Jake Shoemaker (Glenmoore, PA) claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
        55A

      • Kawasaki claims the "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

      • Wyatt Maguire (Mead, WA) claims the Pro Singles National Championship.
        18M

      • Shayna Texter (Willow Street, PA) claims the unofficial Basic Twins title by winning both events.
        25A

      • Henry Wiles wins his 24th Grand National event, placing him into the AMA's all-time Top Ten list for Grand National wins.

      • At the New Kent, VA Grand National Mile event on 8/24/2013, three different OEMs finish on the podium for the first time since 4/30/1972: Jared Mees (H-D), Henry Wiles (Ducati), and Brandon Robinson (Kawasaki).

      • At the Springfield, IL Grand National Mile event on 8/31/2013, a Harley-Davidson fails to finish on the podium for the first time since 5/3/1987.

      • Ronnie Jones becomes the oldest rider (52 yrs, 10 months, 2 days) to score Grand National points by finishing 17th at the Springfield, IL Grand National Mile event on 9/1/2013.
        Misc Notes:
      • J&P Cycles sponsors the Pro Singles National Championship.

      • Sunoco returns as the official fuel of AMA Pro Flat Track.

      • Twin-cylinder equipment rule change:
      • Harley-Davidson XR750 and Honda RS750 engines to be restricted to 32mm on all half miles and 33mm on all mile tracks. (Had been 32mm on all tracks since 2010).
      • Twin-cylinder engines below 750cc remain unrestricted, while twin-cylinder engines above 750cc continue to be restricted to 38mm.
      • Minimum weight for all twin-cylinder engines is 310 lbs.

      • On April 12, AMA/DMG announces that the 'Basic Twins' class will return for the fall Springfield Mile (Labor Day weekend), with the intent of replacing the Pro Singles class at certain events in 2014. The Basic Twins class is open to Pro Singles riders only. XR750 & RS750 engines to use 27mm restrictors; all other engines above 750cc run 32mm restrictors. At first the event, the XR750 and RS750 restrictors are raised from 27mm to 29mm, then to 32mm.

      • The top 20 from the 2012 Pro Singles National Championship are granted provisional licenses to compete at all Grand National twins events in 2013.
        Factory Teams
        1
        Brad Baker
        (HM & M only)

        Bonneville
        Performance
        91
        Mikey Martin
        (HM & M only)

        Factory-Supported Privateer Teams

        Waters
        Auto Body
        27
        Rob Pearson
        (HM & M only)

      2014

      • Jared Mees (Clio,MI) wins his second Grand National Championship.
        9


      • Wyatt Maguire (Mead, WA) claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
        16

      • Kawasaki claims the "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

      • Kyle Johnson (Twin Lake, MI) claims the Pro Singles National Championship.
        77J

      • Jarod Vanderkooi (Mount Gilead, OH) claims the unofficial Basic Twins title by winning both events.
        17F

      • Shayna Texter (Willow Street, PA) becomes the eighth woman to ever hold an AMA Expert dirt track license, and becomes the third woman to ever score AMA Grand National points by finishing 16th at the Knoxville IL half mile (6/15/2014).
        25A

      • Ronnie Jones extends his record as the oldest rider (53 yrs, 10 months, 28 days) to score Grand National points by finishing 11th at the Calistoga, CA Grand National Half Mile event on 9/27/2014.

      • MotoGP World Champion Marc Marquez promotes the first Superprestigio indoor dirt track race at Palau Sant Jordi in Barcelona, Spain on January 11, 2014. Marquez wins the Superprestigio Final, American Brad Baker wins the open final, plus the Superfinal. Americans Merle Scherb and Kenny Noyes also participated.

      • MotoGP World Champion Marc Marquez promotes the second Superprestigio indoor dirt track race at Palau Sant Jordi in Barcelona, Spain on December 13, 2014. Marquez wins the Superprestigio Final, plus the Superfinal. American Jared Mees wins the open final. American Brad Baker, the defending champion, injured his shoulder during practice.
        Misc Notes:
      • DMG eliminates the formal recognition of the Grand National Singles & Twins champions, to focus more attention on the overall Grand National Champion.

      • MotoAmerica, led by former dirt tracker and World Champion RR'er Wayne Rainey, buys the rights to the AMA Superbike Championship from DMG on September 3, 2014.

      • Sunoco returns as the official fuel of AMA Pro Flat Track.

      • Dunlop is named the official tire of AMA Pro Flat Track. The CD-5 and CD-8 tires are, essentially, Goodyear DTII's with the "Dunlop" name on them.

      • On March 12, 2014, AMA Pro Racing, IMSA, and NASCAR launch Fanschoice.tv, which will broadcast all future AMA Pro Racing events. Fanschoice.tv replaces the three-year agreement that AMA Pro Racing signed with Mav-TV in 2010.
        Twin-cylinder equipment rule change:
      • All expert twin-cylinder engines to be un-restricted on all tracks for the first time since 1987.
        Factory Teams
        6
        Brad Baker
        (HM & M only)

        Bonneville
        Performance
        91
        Mikey Martin
        (HM & M only)

        Factory-Supported Privateer Teams

        Waters
        Auto Body
        10
        Johnny Lewis

        Waters
        Auto Body
        82
        Jeremy Higgins

        Waters
        Auto Body
        94B
        Ryan Wells

        Latus Motors
        3
        Joe Kopp
        (select M only)

        Latus Motors
        25A
        Shayna Texter
        (HM & M only)

      2015

      • Jared Mees (Clio, MI) wins his third Grand National Championship.
        1


      • Jarod Vanderkooi (Mount Gilead, OH) claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
        17F

      • Kawasaki claims the "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

      • Davis Fisher (Warren, OR) claims the GNC2 National Championship.
        67M

      • Shayna Texter (Willow Street, PA) becomes the fifth woman in history to wear an AMA National Number.
        52

      • Troy Bayliss, Australia's former World Superbike Champion, competes at select Grand National mile events.
        21I

      • Alex Jorgensen is inducted into the AMHF Hall of Fame from the Dirt Track category.

      • The X-Games hosts a Flat Track competition on a half mile track built at Circuit Of The Americas in Austin, TX on June 4. Bryan Smith takes the Gold Medal, Sammy Halbert the silver, and Brad Baker the bronze.

      • MotoGP World Champion Marc Marquez promotes the third Superprestigio indoor dirt track race at Palau Sant Jordi in Barcelona, Spain on December 12, 2015. Marquez wins the Superprestigio Final, American Brad Baker wins the open final, plus the Superfinal. Americans Jared Mees and Shayna Texter also participated.

      • Steve McLaughlin promotes the Superprestigio Of The Americans indoor dirt track race at the Las Vegas Orelans Arena in Las Vegas, NV on November 21, 2015. Brad Baker wins the Flat Track Final, Larry Pegram wins the All-Star final, and Jared Mees wins the Superprestigio final.
        Misc Notes:
      • Harley-Davidson Motor Company is named the title sponsor of the GNC1 Division.

      • Vance & Hines is named the presenting sponsor the GNC1 division.

      • DMG renames the "Expert" and "Pro" divisions to "GNC1" and "GNC2".

      • GNC2 championship to consist of the combined previous "Pro Singles" and "Basic Twins" events in a combined championship.

      • The Harley-Davidson XG750 is approved for GNC competition on August 3, 2015.

      • On Feburary 4, Dan Johnsen resigns as Director of AMA Flat Track.

      • On Feburary 5, Ronnie Jones is named Senior Director of AMA Flat Track.

      • Dunlop introduces the DT3 dirt track tire to replace the DTII. Compounds are the F-5 (medium front), R-5 (medium rear) and R-8 (hard rear). All GNC1 & GNC2 races must adopt the new DT3 tires by the June 27 Lima, Ohio national.

      • Sunoco returns as the official fuel of AMA Pro Flat Track.

      • Dunlop returns as the official tire of AMA Pro Flat Track.

      • On April 22, the AMA announces a new competition advisory board. The group consists of GNC1 rider Kenny Coolbeth, team owner Craig Rogers, team owner Joe Kopp, tuner Jeff Gordon, team owner Mike Scott, team owner Dick Weirbach, and team owner Craig Parkinson.

      • On July 21, AMA Pro Racing unveils a proposal, as part of their five-year plan for dirt track. The press release states that "The final class structure will be publicly announced in a press conference at the 2015 season finale in Las Vegas during the weekend of November 21-22, 2015".
          Proposed GNC1 structure:
          • All GNC1 class events will be contested on multi-cylinder engine motorcycles.
          • Engine size limits by configuration type to be determined.
          • Minimum weight limits will be applied and linked to engine size.
          • Riders will be required to wear leathers at all events.
          Proposed GNC2 structure:
          • All GNC2 class events will be contested on production motorcycles with single-cylinder engines up to 450cc.
          • A minimum weight limit will be applied.
          • Riders will be required to wear leathers at all events

      • On October 21, 2015, Michael Lock is named CEO of AMA Pro Flat Track.
        Factory Teams
        6
        Brad Baker
        (HM & M only)
        5
        Jake Johnson
        (part-time fill-in
        for injured
        Baker)

        (HM & M only)

        Bonneville
        Performance
        55
        Jake Shoemaker
        (HM & M only)

        Factory-Supported Privateer Teams

        Lloyd Brothers
        10
        Johnny Lewis
        (HM & M only)

        Lloyd Brothers
        21I
        Troy Bayliss
        (M only)

        Waters
        Auto Body
        27
        Rob Pearson

        Latus Motors
        44
        Brandon
        Robinson
        (HM & M only)

      2016

      • Bryan Smith (Flushing, MI) wins the AMA Grand National Championship.
        42

      • JR Addison (Bucyrus, OH) claims the Grand National Rookie of the Year award.
        24F

      • Kawasaki claims the "Grand National Manufacturer's Championship".

      • Ryan Wells (Albion, NY) claims the GNC2 National Championship.
        94B

      • Nichole Mees retires after the 2015 season as the most successful woman in Grand National history. Nichole appeared in 32 Grand National finals from 2007-2015, with a high finish of seventh at the 9/1/2011 Knoxville, IA half mile.

      • Dalton Gauthier wins the GNC2 class at the Phoeniz, AZ mile event on an F800, marking the first National dirt track win for BMW.
        14A

      • Davis Fisher scores the first-ever GNC points for the XG750 by finishing 17th at the Sacramento, CA mile event on May 21.
        67

      • Joe Kopp scores the first-ever GNC points for the Indian FTR750 by finishing 7th at the season finale Santa Rosa, CA mile event on September 25. Kopp also wins the special Dash For Cash in the bike's debut.
        3

      • The X-Games hosts a Flat Track competition on a half mile track built at Circuit Of The Americas in Austin, TX on June 2.

      • Jeff Cole is inducted into the AMHF Hall of Fame from the Dirt Track Category. Dennis Mahan is inducted from the Ambassadors & Industry Category. Ronnie Jones is inducted from the new Well Qualified category.

      • MotoGP World Champion Marc Marquez promotes the fourth Superprestigio indoor dirt track race at Palau Sant Jordi in Barcelona, Spain on December 17, 2016. Marquez wins the Superprestigio final, plus the Superfinal. American Brad Baker wins the Open final.

      • The Spanish Flat Track series, Copa RFME de Flat Track, is created.
        Misc Notes
      • Harley-Davidson Motor Company is named the title sponsor of the GNC1 Division.

      • Vance & Hines is named the presenting sponsor the GNC1 division.

      • The Dash For Cash is eliminated from the Grand National races after the 2015 season.

      • DMG updates the GNC2 format. Three 16-rider heats replaces the old two 16-rider heat format.

      • Sunoco returns as the official fuel of AMA Pro Flat Track.

      • The Indian Motorcycle Race 750 (race-only engine) is approved for AMA GNC competition on Feburary 25 (Competition Bulletin 2016-03)

      • The Zaeta 450 DT Motorcycle is approved for AMA GNC competition on Feburary 26 (Competition Bulletin 2016-04)

      • The Indian Scout Sixty is approved for AMA GNC competition on March 2 (Competition Bulletin 2016-05)

      • The Triumph D Series is approved for AMA GNC competition on April 14 (Competition Bulletin 2016-14)

      • The Honda NC700X is approved for AMA GNC competition on May 20 (Competition Bulletin 2016-15)

      • Competition Bulletin 2016-01, issued on February 15, 2016, announces the AMA Pro Flat Track Advisor Group.

      • Competition Bulletin 2016-09, issued on March 30, 2016, requires mandatory radio communication between race control and each individual race team.

      • Competition Bulletin 2016-17, issued on June 11, 2016, requires number plates with pre-approved fonts.

      • Technical Bulletin 2016-01, released January 6, 2016, states that leathers are required at all twins events, and encouraged at singles events. Bulletin also states that leather racing suits will be required at all events in 2017.

      • Technical bulletin 2016-02, issued 4/22/2016, limits the weight of the rear wheel to 35 pounds, not 40 pounds as is stated in the 2015 & 2016 rulebook. This in response to Rob Pearson's second place finish at COTA (4/16/16) being DQ'd after his rear wheel was found to be overweight.

      • Technical bulletin 2016-03, issued 4/22/2016, requires that riders' last names must appear on the back of their riding apparel. The rider's number is optional, but if it appears, it must match the bike number.

      • The Harley-Davidson XG750 sees its first professional competition when rookie-Expert Davis Fisher (National #67) races one at the Circuit of The Americas Grand National event on April 9. Fisher qualifies 13th out of 40 riders, finishes fifth in the first GNC1 heat (four riders transfer to the final), and finishes fourth in the second GNC1 semi (three riders transfer to the final).

      • The Indian Scout Sixty makes its professional GNC1 debut when Rob Pearson runs it during the second qualifying session at the Circuit of the Americas Grand National event on April 9. Despite only a single four-lap qualifying run, the bike would have qualified 39th fastest. Rob does not race the bike, however.

      • The Indian Scout Sixty makes its professional GNC2 racing debut when Hunter Edwards races it at the Springfield Mile on May 29.

      • On January 6, 2016, Al Ludington is named Technical Director of AMA Pro Flat Track.

      • On January 28, 2016, David McGrath is named Chief Competition Officer of AMA Pro Flat Track.

      • DMG eliminates the "two-minute rule", whereby riders could request time to fix a bike problem after the race is gridded.

      • On May 31, 2016, DMG introduces AFT Events, a subsidiary event promotions company to present "fast-paced and family-friendly" events. "In 2017, the company will bring Pro Flat Track to new USA cities that are hungry for the sport." Their first (and only) event in 2016 will be the July 29 Charlotte HM.
      • DMG introduces a new rule in "which riders who have qulified for a Grand National main event are eligible to apply for a National Number the following season. A rider will retain a National Number as long as they meet the following criteria:
        1. Apply for a GNC1 license each season
        2. Enters and qualified for the evening program in at least one AMA Pro GNC1 National in one of the folliwing last two season

      • Technical bulletin 2016-18, issued 9/1/2016, states that the spec tire for the season finale at Santa Rosa is the Dunlop R10 (hard) compound. The tire had only previously been required at the Oklahoma City mile event on June 18.

      • On September 15, 2016, Al Ludington resigns as Technical Director of AMA Pro Flat Track.
        Factory Teams
        6
        Brad Baker
        (HM & M only)
        67
        Davis Fisher
        (HM & M only)

        Bonneville
        Performance
        55
        Jake Shoemaker
        (HM & M only)
        3
        Joe Kopp
        (Santa Rosa M only)

        Factory-Supported Privateer Teams

        Richie Morris
        Racing
        52
        Shayna Texter
        (ST & TT only)

        Crosley Radio
        42
        Bryan Smith

        Memphis Shades
        66
        Dominic
        Colindres

      2017

        Championship Notes
      • Dalton Gauthier is suspended after winning the Charlotte, NC Half Mile AFT Singles event due to a drug violation. Dalton misses the Phoenix AZ round as he hadn;t yet completed the mandatory recovery program.

      • Misc Notes
      • On September 26, 2016, DMG officially re-brands the sport.
        • AMA Pro Flat track is renamed the American Flat Track Series.
        • The GNC1 class is renamed AFT Twins - the "premier class". They will compete on 650cc-999cc twins at all events.
        • The GNC2 class is renamed AFT Singles - the "up-and-coming riders". They will compete on 450cc singles at all events, and will be competing for "a chance to make it to the prestigious AFT Twins ranks".
        • The District Letters (which had been used since 1947 to identify the home state for all non-National Number riders), are eliminated. All pro riders will use single, double, or triple digits.
        • The race format is changed so that no riders transfer directly from the heats to the finals. Forty-eight riders will be slotted into four twelve-rider heat races. The top eight in each heat race will transfer to two eighteen-rider semis. The riders finishing nith thru twelfth in the heats will transfer to the LCQ. The top four in the LCQ will transfer to the semis. The top nine in each of the two semis will transfer to the final.
      • On September 30, 2016, Octane Motorsports announces that it has secured television coverage for its 2017 Steel Shoe National series that will compete against the American Flat Track Series.
      • On November 15, 2016, Chris Carr is announced as the AMA Chief Competition Officer. Dave McGrath transitions to Race Operations and Technical Director. Steve Morehead remains as Director of Race Events. Becki Edmondson remains as Director of Member Services.
      • On November 19, 2016, Octane Motorsports announces that its 2017 Steel Shoe Nationals will run three classes: 450 DTX, 450 Framer/Pro Twins, and Pro Super Twins.
      • On January 10, 2017, AFT announces that all 18 rounds of the 2017 series will be broadcast on NCBSN. The shows will be one-hour tape-delay broadcasts to air on Thursday nights throughout the summer and fall.
      • On January 27, 2017, the list of approved AFT Twins is released, which includes a "race-only" version of the Harley-Davidson XG750R, called the "XG750R Revolution X".
      • On January 27, 2017, Harley-Davidson announces that its 2017 factory team will compete exclusively on XG750R motorcycles.
      • On January 28, 2017, Harley-Davidson announces that its 2017 factory team will consist of Kenny Coolbeth, Jake Johnson, and Brandon Robinson.

      • National point systems changes to 25-20-17-15-14-13-12-11-10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1. (It had been 23-19-16-15-14-13-12-11-10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 since 1997). No points are awarded for leading the most laps (had been awarded since 2011).

      • AFT Rule book now requires a mandatory 8-minute stoppage for every red flag situation. (This rule was removed in 2009, and re-instated in 2017).

      • AFT Rule Book now lists short tracks as events up to 2,050 feet in length (0.388 mile), while half miles are at least 1,950 feet in length (0.369 mile).

      • AFT Rule Book now requires that the back-up motorcycle must be the same brand as the primary motorcycle.

      • Competition Bulletin 2017-05, released on April 7, 2017, mandates sound testing for all upcoming rounds. All machines must be at or below 105 dbA. The stroke of the engine dictates the rpm at which the bike will be tested.

      • Factory Teams
        2
        Kenny Coolbeth
        5
        Jake Johnson
        44
        Brandon Robinson

        Factory-Supported Privateer Teams

        Crosley Radio
        1
        Bryan Smith

        Crosley Radio
        6
        Brad Baker

        Rogers Racing
        9
        Jared Mees



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      FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS


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      Why were Harleys allowed a 250cc displacement advantage (750cc) over the British imports (500cc) until 1969? The Class C concept was introduced in 1933 to help keep the U.S. motorcycle industry alive during the Great Depression (1929-1939). The displacement advantage that was given to American motorcycles (which were predominantly side-valve design) was intended to encourage competitors to purchase American motorcycles, instead of the British imports (which were overhead valve design). Class C rules allowed any AMA member to compete, provided they had a production motorcycle. More racers using American motorcycles meant more sales, parts, and service for the American motorcycle shops and OEMs. It is unclear why the rule was not challenged often - if at all - from 1946 until 1969.

      How do/did the advancement points work? To advance from Novice to Amateur/Junior to Expert, you needed to accumulate advancement points by competing at AMA Pro Racing events. I do not yet know the exact date when it started; I presume 1933. Points were awarded on a 5-4-3-2-1 scale for the top 5 positions in every heat, semi, or final. For a time - I am not sure yet when it started or ended - short track points were awarded on a 2.5-2.0-1.5-1.0-0.5 scale for the top five riders. Early on you needed 20 advancement points to move from Novice to Amateur/Junior, and 40 advancement points to move from Amateur/Junior to Expert. Up until 1964, a Novice with as few as five points could request to advance to Amateur/Junior. At some point in the late 1960s or early 1970s, the points required doubled - to 40 for Junior and 80 for Expert. Also, up until some point in the 1970s, the advancement points reset to zero every January 1, but later the points were changed to be career accumulative. By the time that I turned pro in 1985, short track points were 5-4-3-2-1, points were 40 & 80, and they did not reset on January 1.

      When were intake restrictors first used? Expert twin-cylinder engines were first restricted on April 1, 1987, when 33mm restrictors were implemented. Junior twin-cylinder engines were first restricted in 1979, when 28mm restrictors were first required.

      How often have the XR750 Expert intake restrictors changed? Expert twin-cylinder engines were first restricted to 33mm in 1987. In 2006, the restrictors were removed for half mile events, but left at 33mm for mile events. In 2010, 32mm restrictors were used at half mile and mile events. In 2013, 33mm restrictors were used everywhere. In 2014, Expert restrictors were removed for the first time since 1987.

      When were multi-cylinder engines outlawed? Interestingly, the rulebooks prior to 1973 only limits displacement and valve orientation, with no commentary on quantity of cylinders or whether the engines need be two-stroke or four-stroke. In 1976, due to safety concerns with the powerful two-stroke four-cylinder road racing engines, all dirt track engines are limited to two cylinders maximum. In 1977, short track events and all Novice division competition are limited to 250cc single-cylinder. In 2006, TT events were officially limited to 450cc singles.

      When were 250cc multi-cylinder two-strokes outlawed? In 1977, when the rules for short track and Novice division competition changed to 250cc single-cylinder engines. Prior to 1976, the number of cylinders was not even considered in the rulebook.

      When were brakes first allowed in oval track competition? In 1963, the AMA began testing the use of brakes on Novice equipment at Ascot Park in Gardena, California. In 1969, the AMA Pro Rulebook stated that "brakes may be used", while the 1977 AMA Pro Rulebook stated that "brakes must be used".

      When were 360cc engines allowed on short tracks? From 1973-1976, 360cc engines or 250cc two-stroke multi-cylinder engines were allowed on short tracks and at all Novice division competition.

      Were compression releases on two-stroke engines ever considered "brakes"? The use of compression releases was not clarified in the rule books until 1969. Neil Keen and Dick Mann began using compression releases in 1967. In June 1968, the AMA announced that compression releases qualified as a "braking device" and were therefore illegal for the remainder of the 1968 season. In 1969, the rulebook was changed to read "compression releases may be installed on two-cycle engines. Compression release is not defined as a brake."

      When was shifting outlawed in the oval track rules? There was no clarification on shifting until 1960. Through 1964, the rulebook read "once a rider shifts into high gear, he cannot shift gears except under a 'hold position' flag". From 1965 to the present, there is no rule on shifting.

      When were the 900cc Sportster engines legal for TT competition? From 1963 through 1972, when there was one division for 0-250cc machines and a second class for 251-900cc machines. Prior to 1963, TT events ran 45ci and 80ci divisions. From 1973 until 2005, the maximum displacement for TT events was limited to 750cc. Since 2006, the largest engine allowed at a TT event is a 450cc single cylinder engine.

      When were the four-stroke single cylinder Rotax engines outlawed for AMA competition? The Rotax engines were never outright outlawed by the AMA. In 1987, Grand National half mile and mile Nationals were limited to "twin-cylinder engines", which eliminated the 600cc, 660cc, and 676cc Rotax singles from competing at those events. That same year, single-cylinder engines over 600cc are prohibited from competing in any dirt track event. In 2006, Grand National short track and TT events were limited to "450cc single cylinder engines". Most tuners had converted their 600cc Rotaxes to 505cc in 2002, and few attempted re-sleeving or re-stroking their 505s to achieve 450cc. Plus, by this time, the Japanese 450cc four-stroke singles were proving competitive, so most tuners built those instead of tweaking their 20-year-old Rotax engines further.

      When were twin cylinder engines outlawed for TT events? In 2006, when the AMA rulebook limited TT equipment to "450cc four-stroke single cylinder engines". In truth, no one had attempted to race a TT on a twin-cylinder engine since 1984, even though the rules had allowed it. The 500cc Rotax single was approved in 1982, the 560cc Rotax single in 1983, and the 660cc Rotax single in 1985. Big bore singles were lighter and faster than the twins, especially on TT courses.

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      AMA PRO RACING
      NUMBER PLATE DESIGNATIONS
      1933-Present


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      Year Plate Rank(s) Plate Rank(s) Plate Rank(s) Plate Rank(s)
      2017
      11
      AFT Twins
      199
      AFT Singles
      2015-2016
      11A
      GNC1
      99Z
      GNC2
      2014
      11A
      Expert
      99Z
      Pro Singles
      Pro Twins
      2013
      11A
      Expert
      99Z
      Pro Singles
      99Z
      Basic Twins
      2009-2012
      11A
      Expert
      99Z
      Pro
      2007-2008
      11A
      Grand National Expert
      Basic Expert Singles
      99Z
      Pro-Sport
      99Z
      Basic Expert Twins
      2006
      11A
      Grand National Expert
      Basic Expert
      99Z
      Pro-Sport
      2002-2005
      11A
      Grand National Expert
      Basic Expert
      99Z
      Pro-Sport
      66P
      883 Sportster
      1999-2001
      11A
      Grand National Expert
      Basic Expert
      99Z
      Pro-Sport
      66P
      883 Sportster
      77S
      Supertracker
      1997-1998
      11A
      Grand National Expert
      Basic Expert
      99Z
      Pro-Sport
      1993-1996
      11A
      Grand National Expert
      Basic Expert
      99Z
      Pro-Am
      1987-1992
      11A
      Expert
      55N
      Junior
      99Z
      Pro-Am
      1
      Camel Pro Series Champion
      1986
      11A
      Expert
      55N
      Junior
      99Z
      Pro-Am
      1985
      11A
      Expert
      55N
      Junior
      199Z
      Novice
      1984
      A11
      Expert
      N55
      Junior
      Z199
      Novice
      1971-1983
      11A
      Expert
      55N
      Junior
      199Z
      Novice
      1959-1970
      11A
      Expert
      55N
      Amateur
      99Z
      Novice
      88Y
      Probationary Novice
      1956-1958
      11A
      Class A / Expert
      55N
      Class B / Amateur
      1953-1955
      11A
      Expert
      55N
      Amateur
      99Z
      Novice
      1948-1952
      11A
      Expert
      55N
      Amateur
      99Z
      Novice
      1947
      11A
      Expert
      55N
      Amateur
      99Z
      Novice
      1933-1941
      1946
      11
      Expert
      55
      Amateur
      99
      Novice

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